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XXVI. Armeekorps
XXVI Armeekorps emblem.svg
Active August 1939–early 1945
Country  Nazi Germany
Branch Army
Size Corps
Nickname(s) Corps Wodrig
Engagements

Battle of Mlawa

Siege of Leningrad

Operation Bagration
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Albert Wodrig

The XXVI Army Corps (German language: XXVI. Armeekorps) was a Wehrmacht army corps during World War II. It existed from 1939 to 1945. It was also known as Corps Wodrig (German: Korps Wodrig) during the Invasion of Poland.

History

The XXVI Army Corps was formed under the name Führungsstab z. b. V. under the supervision of AOK 1 in Königsberg on 22 August 1939. Its initial commander was Albert Wodrig, earning it the nickname Korps Wodrig before the official designation as an army corps on 1 October.[1]

During the Invasion of Poland, Corps Wodrig oversaw the 1st and 12th Infantry Divisions, as well as the 1st Cavalry Brigade.[2] Corps Wodrig was stationed in southern East Prussia as part of 3rd Army, commanded by Georg von Küchler.[3] The 3rd Army was in turn under the supervision of Army Group North, commanded by Fedor von Bock.[2] In the opening days of the invasion, Corps Wodrig struck straight south into the units of the Polish Modlin Army in the Mława area.[3] The resulting Battle of Mława ended in German victory. Corps Wodrig advanced further towards Warsaw, assisting the German pincer movement against the German capital.

On 1 October 1939, Corps Wodrig was officially redesignated XXVI. Armeekorps, formally upgrading it from a z. b. V. special deployment staff to a full army corps in its own right. In December 1939, XXVI Army Corps was attached to the 6th Army and redeployed to the Lower Rhine area.[1]

In early 1940, the army corps was reshuffled and moved through several armies in quick succession, including the 4th Army, 18th Army and 2nd Army. Under 18th Army, XXVI Army Corps participated on the northern flank of the German invasion force during the Battle of France. The corps fought in the Netherlands and in Flanders.[1] Its initial makeup on 10 May 1940 were the 207th, 254th and 256th Infantry Divisions, as well as the 4th SS Panzergrenadier Regiment.[4] After a brief stay in the Reims area after the German victory over France, the corps was transferred back to its home region, East Prussia.[1] There, its subordinate units remained consistent from 21 July 1940 to 12 March 1941 and were made up by the 161st, 217th and 291st Infantry Divisions.[4]

For Operation Barbarossa, XXVI Army Corps operated under Army Group North and supervised the 61st, 217th and 291st Infantry Divisions.[4] It advanced through the Baltic region into the Leningrad area. It remained in the vicinity of Leningrad throughout the entire duration of the Siege of Leningrad, which was broken by the Red Army on 27 January 1944.[1]

On 3 March 1944, the XXVI Army Corps joined the newly formed Armeeabteilung Narwa, the army-level promotion of the former LIV Army Corps that was designed to defend the Narva region.[1][5]

On 15 July 1944, XXVI Army Corps joined the 3rd Panzer Army, making it part of Army Group Centre at the time of Operation Bagration, the Soviet offensive that started on 23 June 1944 and that brought about the total collapse of Army Group Centre. The XXVI Army Corps was pushed back by the Red Army along with the rest of the German armed forces. At the time of German surrender on 8 May 1945, the remnants of XXVI Army Corps which had been fighting in the corps' home in East Prussia were no longer able to mount an organized resistance against the Red Army.[1]

Organizational chart

Organizational chart of the XXVI Army Corps[1]
Year Date Units attached to XXVI Army Corps[4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Army Army Group Operational Area
1939 1 September 1st Infantry, 12th Infantry 3rd Army Army Group North East Prussia and Poland
4 December 7th Infantry, 14th Infantry, 253rd Infantry 6th Army Army Group B Lower Rhine
1940 15 January None 4th Army Eifel
10 May 207th Infantry, 254th Infantry, 256th Infantry, 4th SS Pz.Gren. Regiment 18th Army Netherlands and Flanders
9 June 34th Infantry, 45th Infantry 2nd Army Army Group A Reims
21 July 161st Infantry, 217th Infantry, 291st Infantry 18th Army Under OKH East Prussia
1 August
13 September Army Group B
7 October
7 November
12 December
1941 15 January
10 February
12 March
5 April 61st Infantry, 161st Infantry, 217th Infantry, 291st Infnatry
1 May 61st Infantry, 269th Infantry, 290th Infantry, 291st Infantry Army Group C
5 June 61st Infantry, 217th Infantry, 291st Infantry Army Group North Riga and Leningrad
1 July 1st Infantry, 61st Infantry, 217th Infantry
7 August 93rd Infantry, 254th Infantry, 291st Infantry
3 September 93rd Infantry, 291st Infantry
2 October 93rd Infantry, 217th Infantry
4 November
4 December 93rd Infantry, 212th Infantry, 217th Infantry
1942 2 January Leningrad
6 February
10 March
5 April 93rd Infantry, 217th Infantry
11 May 7th Infantry, 223rd Infantry, 227th Infantry
8 June 223rd Infantry, 227th Infantry
4 July
5 August
2 September 28th Infantry, 170th Infantry, 223rd Infantry, 227th Infantry
8 October 28th Infantry, 131st Infantry, 170th Infantry, 227th Infantry, 5th Mountain 11th Army Under OKH
5 November 24th Infantry, 223rd Infantry, 227th Infantry 18th Army Army Group North
1 December 24th Infantry, 96th Infantry, 223rd Infantry, 227th Infantry
1943 1 January 1st Infantry, 96th Infantry, 170th Infantry, 221st Infantry, 223rd Infantry
3 February 11th Infantry, 21st Infantry, 28th Infantry, 61st Infantry, 96th Infantry, 170th Infantry
4 March 11th Infantry, 21st Infantry, 28th Infantry, 212th Infantry
9 April 1st Infantry, 11th Infantry, 28th Infantry, 69th Infantry, 212th Infantry, 223rd Infantry, 5th Mountain
1 May
1 June
7 July 1st Infantry, 11th Infantry, 28th Infantry, 69th Infantry, 212th Infantry, 290th Infantry, 5th Mountain
5 August 1st Infantry, 11th Infantry, 28th Infantry, 58th Infantry, 69th Infantry, 126th Infantry, 212th Infantry, 290th Infantry, 5th Mountain
5 September 21st Infantry, 58th Infantry, 61st Infantry, 69th Infantry, 212th Infantry, 215th Infantry, 225th Infantry, 254th Infantry, 290th Infantry, 5th Mountain
4 October 61st Infantry, 69th Infantry, 212th Infantry, 215th Infantry, 227th Infantry, 254th Infantry, 290th Infantry, 5th Mountain
8 November 61st Infantry, 212th Infantry, 227th Infantry, 254th Infantry, 5th Mountain
3 December 61st Infantry, 212th Infantry, 227th Infantry, 254th Infantry
1944 1 January
1 February None
3 March 11th Infantry, 225th Infantry Armeeabteilung Narwa

(formed from LIV Corps)

Narva
15 April 11th Infantry, 58th Infantry, 225th Infantry
15 May
15 June 170th Infantry, 225th Infantry, 227th Infantry
15 July 69th Infantry, 201st Infantry, Generalkommando Rothkirch, 6th Panzer 3rd Panzer Army Army Group Centre Lithuania
31 August 1st Infantry, 52nd Infantry, 549th Grenadier, 561st Infantry, Werthern, Schirmer, D
16 September 1st Infantry, 549th Grenadier, D, Schirmer, Werthern 4th Army East Prussia
13 October 1st Infantry, 56th Infantry, 349th Infantry
5 November 1st Infantry, 56th Infantry, 61st Infantry, 349th Infantry, 549th Volksgrenadier 3rd Panzer Army
26 November 1st Infantry, 61st Infantry, 69th Infantry, 349th Infantry, 549th Volksgrenadier
31 December 1st Infantry, 69th Infantry, 349th Infantry, 549th Volksgrenadier
1945 19 February 14th Infantry, 28th Infantry, 349th Infantry, 549th Volksgrenadier, Einem
1 March 28th Infantry, 299th Infantry, 349th Infantry, 24th Panzer 4th Army Army Group North
12 April Unclear AOK Ostpreußen Under OKH

Commanders

  • General der Artillerie Albert Wodrig (22 August 1939 - 1 October 1942)
  • General der Infanterie Ernst von Leyser (1 October 1942 - 1 July 1943)
  • General der Panzertruppen Gustav Fehn (1 July - 19 August 1943)
  • General der Infanterie Ernst von Leyser (19 August - 31 October 1943)
  • General der Infanterie Carl Hilpert (31 October 1943 - 1 January 1944)
  • General der Infanterie Martin Grase (1 January - 15 February 1944)
  • General der Infanterie Anton Grasser (15 February - 11 May 1944)
  • General der Artillerie Wilhelm Berlin (11 May - 15 June 1944)
  • General der Infanterie Anton Grasser (15 June - 6 July 1944)
  • General der Infanterie Gerhard Matzky (6 July 1944 - May 1945)

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Tessin, Georg (1977). "Generalkommando XXVI. Armeekorps (röm. 26. AK)" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 15-30. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 4. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 236–237. ISBN 3764810971. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Zaloga, Steven (2003). Poland 1939: The Birth of Blitzkrieg. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. pp. 35. ISBN 1841764086. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Zaloga, Steven (2003). Poland 1939: The Birth of Blitzkrieg. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. pp. 37. ISBN 1841764086. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Tessin, Georg (1977). "18. Armee" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 15-30. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 4. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 80–84. ISBN 3764810971. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Tessin, Georg (1977). "Armeeabteilung Narwa" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte: Namensverbände. Luftstreitkräfte (Fliegende Verbände). Flakeinsatz im Reich 1943-1945.. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 14. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 171–172. ISBN 3764810971. 
  6. Tessin, Georg (1977). "3. Armee" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 1-5. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 2. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 153–154. ISBN 3764810971. 
  7. Tessin, Georg (1977). "6. Armee" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 6-14. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 3. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 1–8. ISBN 3764810971. 
  8. Tessin, Georg (1977). "4. Armee" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 1-5. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 2. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 219–224. ISBN 3764810971. 
  9. Tessin, Georg (1977). "2. Armee" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 1-5. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 2. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 83–88. ISBN 3764810971. 
  10. Tessin, Georg (1977). "3. Panzer-Armee (Pz. AOK 3)" (in German). Die Landstreitkräfte 1-5. Verbände und Truppen der deutschen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS im Zweiten Weltkrieg 1939-1945. 2. Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag. pp. 154–159. ISBN 3764810971. 

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