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SS George Ade
Career (United States)
Name: George Ade
Namesake: George Ade
Owner: War Shipping Administration (WSA)
Operator: American West African Line Inc.
Ordered: as type (EC2-S-C1) hull, MC hull 2314
Builder: J.A. Jones Construction, Panama City, Florida
Cost: $1,024,537[1]
Yard number: 55
Way number: 4
Laid down: 30 June 1944
Launched: 9 August 1944
Completed: 25 August 1944
Identification:
  • Call sign: WSSN
  • ICS Whiskey.svgICS Sierra.svgICS Sierra.svgICS November.svg[1]
Fate:
  • Laid up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, in Mobile, Mobile, 9 October 1947
  • Status: Sold for scrapping, 21 February 1967, withdrawn from fleet, 8 March 1967
    General characteristics [2]
    Class & type:
    • Liberty ship
    • type EC2-S-C1, standard
    Tonnage:
  • 10,865 LT DWT
  • 7,176 GRT
  • Displacement:
  • 3,380 long tons (3,434 t) (light)
  • 14,245 long tons (14,474 t) (max)
  • Length: 441 ft 6 in (135 m)
    Beam: 56 ft 10.75 in (17.3419 m)
    Draft: 27 ft 9.25 in (8.4646 m)
    Installed power:
    • 2 × Oil fired 450 °F (232 °C) boilers, operating at 220 psi (1,500 kPa)
    • 2,500 hp (1,900 kW)
    Propulsion:
  • 2 × oil-fired boilers
  • 1 × triple-expansion steam engine, 2,500 horsepower (1,900 kW) (manufactured by Hamilton Engine Co., Hamilton, Ohio)
  • 1 × screw propeller
  • Speed: 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h)
    Capacity: 10,800 long tons deadweight (DWT)
    Complement: 41
    Armament:
    • Stern-mounted 4"/50 caliber (102 mm) gun for use against surfaced submarines
    • variety of anti-aircraft guns

    SS George Ade was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War II. She was named after Indiana writer, newspaper columnist, playwright, and namesake for Purdue University's Ross–Ade Stadium, George Ade.

    Construction

    George Ade was laid down on 30 June 1944, under a Maritime Commission (MARCOM) contract, MC hull 2314, by J.A. Jones Construction, Panama City, Florida; and launched on 9 August 1944.[3][1]

    History

    She was allocated to American West African Line Inc., 18 August 1944. She successfully completed her seatrials on 20 August 1944.

    While in transit from Key West, Florida, to New York City, she was torpedoed on 12 September 1944, off the coast of North Carolina, by German submarine U-518. Her rudder was damaged but she stayed afloat. USCGC Jackson and USCGC Bedloe, heading to assist the crew of George Ade, were caught in the Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944 the day after, sinking both cutters and killing 47 Coast Guardsmen.[4][5][Note 1] A U.S. Navy seaplane rescued the survivors.[4][5]

    After repairs she was allocated to the Parry Navigation Co., Inc. on 18 July 1946, and again on 17 November 1946.[6] On 17 September 1947, she was allocated to the South Atlantic Steamship Line, for transfer to the National Defense Reserve Fleet, in Mobile, Alabama. She was sold, On 21 February 1967, for $48,259 to Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation, to be scrapped. She was withdrawn from the fleet on 8 March 1967.[6]

    Notes

    1. The Coast Guard's official 1947 history, Lost Cutters, reports a combined total of 47 deaths on the two cutters. However, Silverstein (2006) reports 48 deaths.

    References

    Bibliography


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