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SS Charles F. Amidon
File:SS Charles F Amidon.png
Charles F. Amidon on 27 December 1943
Career (United States)
Name: Charles F. Amidon
Namesake: Charles F. Amidon
Builder: Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation
Yard number: 781
Laid down: 24 September 1943
Launched: 11 October 1943
Completed: 19 October 1943
Out of service: March 1961
Homeport: Portland
Identification:
  • Callsign: KUBH
  • ICS Kilo.svgICS Uniform.svgICS Bravo.svgICS Hotel.svg
Fate: Scrapped, 1961
General characteristics [1]
Class & type:
  • Liberty ship
  • type EC2-S-C1, standard
Tonnage:
  • 10,865 LT DWT
  • 7,176 GRT
  • Displacement:
  • 3,380 long tons (3,434 t) (light)
  • 14,245 long tons (14,474 t) (max)
  • Length: 441 ft 6 in (135 m)
    Beam: 56 ft 10.75 in (17.3419 m)
    Draft: 27 ft 9.25 in (8.4646 m)
    Installed power:
    • 2 × Oil fired 450 °F (232 °C) boilers, operating at 220 psi (1,500 kPa)
    • 2,500 hp (1,900 kW)
    Propulsion:
  • 2 × oil-fired boilers
  • 1 × triple-expansion steam engine, 2,500 horsepower (1,900 kW) (manufactured by Hamilton Engine Co., Hamilton, Ohio)
  • 1 × screw propeller
  • Speed: 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h)
    Capacity: 10,800 long tons deadweight (DWT)
    Complement: 41
    Armament:
    • Stern-mounted 4"/50 caliber (102 mm) gun for use against surfaced submarines
    • variety of anti-aircraft guns

    SS Charles F. Amidon was an American Liberty ship built in 1943 for service in World War II. Her namesake was Charles F. Amidon, an American Judge from 1896 to 1928.

    Description

    The ship was 442 ft 8 in (134.92 m) long overall (417 ft 9 in (127.33 m) between perpendiculars, 427 ft 0 in (130.15 m) waterline), with a beam of 57 ft 0 in (17.37 m). She had a depth of 34 ft 8 in (10.57 m) and a draught of 27 ft 9 in (8.46 m). She was assessed at 7,210 GRT, 4,880 NRT, 10,856 DWT.[1][2]

    She was powered by a triple expansion steam engine, which had cylinders of 24.5 inches (62 cm), 37 inches (94 cm) and 70 inches (180 cm) diameter by 70 inches (180 cm) stroke. The engine was built by the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, Harrison, New Jersey. It drove a single screw propeller,[2] which could propel the ship at 11 knots (20 km/h).[1]

    Construction and career

    This ship was built by Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation in Portland. She was laid down on 24 September 1943 and launched on 11 October 1943, later completed on 19 October 1943.[3][4]

    She departed Colombo together with Convoy JC 54B on 4 July 1944 for Calcutta while carrying army stores, she arrived six days later.[5] The ship returned to Colombo with Convoy CJ 37 on 2 August.[6] Carlos Carrillo together with Convoy GUS 50 departed from Port Said, on 23 August, for Hampton Roads.[7] She again departed from Hampton Roads for Port Said with Convoy UGS 57 from 12 October until 18 September.[8] The ship then left with Convoy GUS 57, for Cristóbal, from 15 November until 2 December.[9]

    Throughout 1945, she made independent trips to Eniwetok, Port Townsend, Hagushi, Kossol Roads, Tacloban, Pearl Harbor, San Francisco, Ulithi, Okinawa, Takuu and Balboa.[10]

    In 1946, the ship was transferred to the United States Department of Commerce in Portland, Oregon.[11] In March 1961, she was then sold to Zidell Explorations Inc., Tacoma for opphogging.[11] She was scrapped in 1961 after being sold to Ankom on 16 March 1961.[12][11]

    References

    This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
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