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SM UC-78
Career (German Empire)
Name: UC-78
Ordered: 12 January 1916[1]
Builder: AG Vulcan, Hamburg[2]
Yard number: 83[1]
Launched: 8 December 1916[1]
Commissioned: 10 January 1917[1]
Fate: rammed and sunk by SS Queen Alexandra, 9 May 1918[1]
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type UC II submarine
Displacement: 410 t (450 short tons), surfaced[2]
493 t (543 short tons), submerged
Length: 165 ft 6 in (50.44 m)[2]
Beam: 17 ft 4 in (5.28 m)[2]
Draft: 12 ft 2 in (4 m)[3]
Propulsion: 2 × propeller shafts
2 × 6-cylinder, 4-stroke diesel engines, 500 bhp (370 kW)[3]
2 × electric motors, 460 shp (340 kW)[3]
Speed: 11.8 knots (21.9 km/h), surfaced[2]
7.3 knots (13.5 km/h), submerged
Endurance: 8,660 nautical miles @ 7 knots, surfaced[3]
(16,040 km @ 13 km/h)
52 nautical miles @ 4 knots, submerged[3]
(96 km @ 7.4 km/h)
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)[3]
Complement: 26[3]
Armament: 6 × 100 cm (39.4 in) mine tubes[3]
18 × UC 200 mines
3 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 bow/external; one stern)
7 × torpedoes
1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) KL/30 deck gun[2]
Notes: 30-second diving time[2]

SM UC-78 was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German language: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 12 January 1916 and was launched on 8 December 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 10 January 1917 as SM UC-78.[Note 1] In 12 patrols UC-78 was credited with sinking a single ship, either by torpedo or by mines laid. UC-78 was rammed and sunk by the British steamer Queen Alexandra west of Cherbourg on 9 May 1918.[1]

Notes

  1. "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UC-78". U-Boat War in World War I. Uboat.net. http://uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=UC+78. Retrieved 23 February 2009. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Tarrant, p. 173.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 Gardiner, p. 182.

Bibliography


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