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SM U-17 (Germany)
U-Boote Kiel 1914.jpg
U-17 (second row, second from the right), Kiel Harbour, February 1914
Career (Germany)
Name: U-17
Ordered: 10 May 1910
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig
Cost: 2,333,000 Goldmark
Yard number: 11
Laid down: 1 October 1910
Launched: 16 April 1912
Commissioned: 3 November 1912
Struck: 27 January 1919
Fate: Struck 27 January 1919, scrapped at Imperial Dockyard, Kiel. Pressure hull sold to Stinnes, Hamburg on 3 February 1920.
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type U 17 submarine
Displacement: 564 t (622 short tons) ↑
691 t (762 short tons) ↓
Length: 62.35 m (204 ft 7 in)
Beam: 6 m (19 ft 8 in)
Height: 7.30 m (23 ft 11 in)
Draught: 3.40 m (11 ft 2 in)
Propulsion: 2 shafts
2 × 2 Körting 8-cylinder two stroke paraffin motors with 1,400 PS (1,400 hp)
2 × AEG electric motors with 1,120 PS (1,100 hp)
550 rpm ↑
425 rpm ↓
Speed: 14.9 knots (27.6 km/h) ↑
9.5 knots (17.6 km/h) ↓
Range: 6,700 nautical miles (7,700 mi; 12,400 km) @ 8 kn ↑
75 nautical miles (86 mi; 139 km) @ 5 kn ↓
Test depth: 50 m (164 ft 1 in)
Boats & landing
craft carried:
1 dingi
Complement: 4 officers, 25 men
Armament: 4 x 45 cm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 each bow and stern) with 6 torpedoes
1 × 5 cm (2.0 in) SK L/40 gun
1 x 3.7 cm (1.5 in) Hotchkiss gun
Service record
Part of: Imperial German Navy Baltic Flotilla,
II Flotilla,
Training Flotilla
Commanders: Johannes Feldkirchener 1 August 19147 March 1915,
Hans Walther 8 March 19159 January 1916
Operations: 4 patrols
Victories: 12 ships sunk for a total of 16,550 GRT; 1 ship captured for a total of 3,538 GRT.

SM U-17 was a German submarine during World War I. U-17 sank the first British merchant vessel in the First World War, and also sank another nine ships and captured one ship, surviving the war without casualty.

War service[]

Oberleutnant z.S. Feldkirchener

On 1 August 1914, Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Feldkirchener was given command of U-17.[1] On 20 October, U-17 stopped the 866 ton SS Glitra off the Norwegian coast, and having searched her cargo, ordered the crew to the lifeboats before scuttling the vessel. On 26 October, U-17 torpedoed the French ferry SS Admiral Ganteaume in the Strait of Dover. The vessel made port before sinking, with the loss of 40 lives out of over 2,500 on board.[2]

On 2 March 1915 the command of U-17 passed to Kapitänleutnant Hans Walther. On 12 June 1915, U-17 chased and torpedoed the SS Desabla off the coast of Scotland. The crew escaped on lifeboats while the vessel was scuttled and sunk. Walther's command ended on 9 January 1916 and the next day U-17 joined the Training Flotilla.[1]

Post war[]

U-17 was decommissioned on 27 January 1919 and sold for scrapping.

Notes[]

References[]

  • Spindler, Arno (1932,1933,1934,1941/1964,1966). Der Handelskrieg mit U-Booten. 5 Vols. Berlin: Mittler & Sohn. Vols. 4+5, dealing with 1917+18, are very hard to find: Guildhall Library, London, has them all, also Vol. 1-3 in an English translation: The submarine war against commerce. 
  • Beesly, Patrick (1982). Room 40: British Naval Intelligence 1914-1918. London: H Hamilton. ISBN 978-0-241-10864-2. 
  • Halpern, Paul G. (1917). A Naval History of World War I. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-85728-498-0. 
  • Roessler, Eberhard (1997). Die Unterseeboote der Kaiserlichen Marine. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-5963-7. 
  • Schroeder, Joachim (2002). Die U-Boote des Kaisers. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-6235-4. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2008). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol I., The Fleet in Action. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-76-3. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2009). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol II., The Fleet in Being. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-77-0. 

External links[]



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