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Sir Robert Freer
Born (1923-09-01)September 1, 1923
Died 15 January 2012(2012-01-15) (aged 88)
Place of birth Darjeeling, British India
Place of death Farnham, Surrey, England
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  Royal Air Force
Years of service 1944–1982
Rank Air Chief Marshal
Commands held No. 92 Squadron
RAF Seletar
No. 11 Group
No. 18 Group
Battles/wars World War II
Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation
Awards Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire
Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

Air Chief Marshal Sir Robert William George Freer GBE KCB (1 September 1923 – 15 January 2012) was a Royal Air Force officer who became Deputy Commander of RAF Strike Command.

RAF career

Educated at Gosport Grammar School, Freer joined the Royal Air Force during World War II and became a flying instructor.[1] He was given command of No. 92 Squadron in 1955[1] and became Station Commander of RAF Seletar in Singapore in 1963 during the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation.[2] He was made Deputy Director of Defence Plans in 1966, Deputy Commandant of the RAF Staff College, Bracknell in 1969 and Senior Air Staff Officer at Headquarters Near East Air Force in 1971.[1] He went on to be Air Officer Commanding No. 11 Group in 1972, Air Officer Commanding No. 18 Group in 1975 and Deputy Commander of RAF Strike Command in 1978.[1] His last appointment was as Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies in 1980 before he retired in 1982.[1]

In retirement he became a Director of Rediffusion.[1] He died at home on 15 January 2012.[3]

Family

In 1950 he married Margaret Tinkler; they had one son and one daughter.[1]

References

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
I G Broom
Air Officer Commanding No. 11 Group
1972–1975
Succeeded by
W Harbison
Preceded by
Sir Alfred Ball
Deputy Commander-in-Chief Strike Command
1978–1979
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Kennedy
Preceded by
Sir David Fraser
Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies
1980–1982
Succeeded by
Sir William Pillar

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