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Raymond McKee
Motion Picture Magazine, 1915
Born Eldon Raymond McKee
(1892-12-07)December 7, 1892
Keokuk, Iowa, U.S.
Died October 3, 1984(1984-10-03) (aged 91)
Long Beach, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1912–1935
Spouse(s) Marguerite Courtot (m. 1923)

Raymond McKee (born Eldon Raymond McKee; also credited as Roy McKee; December 7, 1892 – October 3, 1984) was an American stage and screen actor. His film debut was in the 1912 production The Lovers' Signal. Over the next 23 years, he performed in no less than 172 additional films.

Early life[]

McKee was born in Keokuk, Iowa. Genealogical records indicate that his parents were Albert N. McKee and Alice Yetter McKee. During World War I, he was an Army lieutenant in France and reportedly wore his uniform in four war-themed films.[1]

Stage and film careers[]

On Broadway, McKee portrayed Jack Weaver in The Phantom Legion (1919).[2] He also acted on stage in A Fool There Was, The Fortune Teller, and Madame X.[1]

Early in his acting career, McKee also made films in the eastern United States for the Edison and Lubin studios and was billed as "Roy McKee". From 1926 to 1928, he was associated with Mack Sennett, with McKee portraying Jimmy Smith in a series of approximately 30 Smith Family comedy films.[1]

Personal life and death[]

During the filming of The Unbeliever in 1918, McKee worked with his future wife, actress Marguerite Courtot. The two performers worked together again in 1922 in the production Down to the Sea in Ships. They wed the following year on April 14 and remained married for nearly 60 years, until Raymond's death.[1] After retiring from acting, McKee focused his attention on The Zulu Hut, a restaurant that he originally opened in Los Angeles in the 1920s.[1]

McKee in 1984, at age 91, died in Long Beach, California from pneumonia. A United States Army veteran, his gravesite is at Riverside National Cemetery in Riverside, California.[3] His wife Marguerite was buried alongside him two years later.

Partial filmography[]

A still from the 1922 horror film A Blind Bargain with McKee (right) and Lon Chaney as "The Hunchback".

  • Dobs at the Shore (1914)
  • He Wanted His Pants (1914)
  • The Servant Girl's Legacy (1914)
  • The Honor of the Force (1914)
  • She Married for Love (1914)
  • The Smuggler's Daughter (1914)
  • When the Ham Turned (1914)
  • Jealous James (1914)
  • Pins Are Lucky (1914)
  • The Green Alarm (1914)
  • Making Auntie Welcome (1914)
  • Worms Will Turn (1914)
  • Kidnapped Bride (1914)
  • Long May It Wave (1914)
  • A Brewerytown Romance (1914)
  • A Tango Tragedy (1914)
  • For Two Pins (1914)
  • The Particular Cowboys (1914)
  • He Won a Ranch (1914)
  • Outwitting Dad (1914)
  • The Simp and the Sophomores (1915)
  • Not Much Force (1915)
  • Poor Baby (1915)
  • What a Cinch (1915)
  • Her Choice (1915)
  • Capturing Bad Bill (1915)
  • A Lucky Strike (1915)
  • An Expensive Visit (1915)
  • The Prize Baby (1915)
  • Shoddy the Tailor (1915)
  • They Looked Alike (1915)
  • Twin Flats (1916)
  • A Maid to Order (1916)
  • It Happened in Pikesville (1916)
  • Edison Bugg's Invention (1916)
  • Kidnapped (1917)
  • Where Love Is (1917)
  • The Apple Tree Girl (1917)
  • The Lady of the Photograph (1917)
  • The Little Chevalier (1917)
  • The Last Sentence (1917)
  • Billy and the Big Stick (1917)
  • The Unbeliever (1918)
  • The End of the Road (1919)
  • Kathleen Mavourneen (1919)
  • Love's Harvest (1920)
  • The Girl of My Heart (1920)
  • Flame of Youth (1920)
  • The Little Wanderer (1920)
  • The Fortune Teller (1920)
  • Wing Toy (1921)
  • The Lamplighter (1921)
  • Blind Hearts (1921)
  • The Mother Heart (1921)
  • Lovetime (1921)
  • A Blind Bargain (1922)
  • Down to the Sea in Ships (1922)
  • Forgive and Forget (1923)
  • Three Women (1924)
  • Pagan Passions (1924)
  • Babbitt (1924)
  • Contraband (1925)
  • Romance Road (1925)
  • Exclusive Rights (1926)
  • King of the Herd (1927)
  • Heart to Heart (1928)
  • Frozen River (1929)
  • Campus Knights (1929)

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Longden, Tom (March 23, 2008). "McKee proved his versatility in silent film era". The Des Moines Register. Iowa, Des Moines. p. 2 B. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/49876766/raymond-mckee/. Retrieved April 30, 2020. 
  2. "Raymond McKee". The Broadway League. Archived from the original on April 30, 2020. https://archive.today/20200430012758/https://www.ibdb.com/broadway-cast-staff/raymond-mckee-52434. Retrieved April 30, 2020. 
  3. Wilson, Scott (2016). Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons (3rd ed.). McFarland. p. 501. ISBN 9781476625997. 

External links[]

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