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Pat Flanagan
Flanagan in a publicity photo
Flanagan in a publicity photo
Born Charles Carroll Flanagan
(1893-04-11)April 11, 1893[1]
Clinton, Iowa, U.S.[1]
Died July 2, 1963(1963-07-02) (aged 70)
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Alma mater Grinnell College
Palmer College of Chiropractic
Occupation Broadcaster
Spouse(s) Hazel Elinor Rieman[2]

Charles Carroll "Pat" Flanagan (April 11, 1893 – July 2, 1963), was a play-by-play broadcaster for Major League Baseball's Chicago Cubs from 1929 to 1943.

Biography

Flanagan was born in 1893 in Clinton, Iowa; graduated in 1913 from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa; and later studied at the Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa, during the 1920s.[2] After college, he worked in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and Chicago.[2] He served with the medical detachment of the 33rd Infantry Division during World War I.[2]

Flanagan first broadcast sports for WOC in Davenport in 1921,[3] getting his start as a fill-in announcer.[2] He joined WBBM in Chicago in 1927, and became their first baseball announcer.[2] He served as the radio announcer of Chicago Cubs games from 1929 to 1943,[4] and also announced Chicago White Sox games.[5] While home games in Chicago were broadcast live, Flanagan recreated the play-by-play for road games from reports transmitted by ticker tape.[5]

In 1933, Flanagan served as radio announcer for the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game, held at Comiskey Park.[6] He also did the play-by-play for three World Series (Template:Wsy, Template:Wsy, and Template:Wsy) for CBS Radio.[6] In his final season of announcing for the Cubs, 1943, he was assisted by Bert Wilson, who took over the lead role in 1944.[7]

Flanagan died in 1963 in Scottsdale, Arizona.[3] At the time of his death, he was the sports director for KOOL in Phoenix, Arizona.[3] Flanagan has twice been a finalist for the Ford C. Frick Award, presented by the National Baseball Hall of Fame.[8][9]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Draft Registration Card". Selective Service System. June 1917. https://www.fold3.com/image/560092454. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 "They Started Here: Pat Flanagan, Baseball Broadcaster". Mason City, Iowa. September 28, 1940. p. 16. http://iagenweb.org/cerrogordo/bios/StartedHere/cg_bio_started_flanaganchascpat.htm. Retrieved November 15, 2021. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Pat Flanagan, Pioneer Sportscaster, Dies". Evansville, Indiana. July 3, 1963. p. 13. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/88964094/pat-flanagan-pioneer-sportscaster-dies/. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  4. "Cubs Broadcasters". https://www.mlb.com/cubs/history/broadcasters. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 "2022 Ford C. Frick Award Ballot". October 2021. https://baseballhall.org/discover/2022-frick-award-ballot-announced. Retrieved November 15, 2021. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 "2006 Ford Frick Award nominees". http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/events/hof/y2006/frick_bios.jsp. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  7. "Bert Wilson". 2016. https://baseballhall.org/discover/awards/ford-c-frick/2016-candidates/wilson-bert. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  8. Yellon, Al (October 22, 2018). "Pat Flanagan, early Cubs broadcaster, is a 2019 Frick Award finalist". https://www.bleedcubbieblue.com/2018/10/22/18010500/pat-flanagan-cubs-broadcaster-frick-award-finalist-2019. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 
  9. "Hall of Fame announces finalists for 2022 Ford C. Frick Award". October 16, 2021. https://www.thedailystar.com/sports/local_sports/hall-of-fame-announces-finalists-for-2022-ford-c-frick-award/article_75151577-b63f-5812-95a9-649db23e3c45.html. Retrieved November 14, 2021. 

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