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Okō Castle
Nankoku, Kōchi Prefecture, Japan
Oko Castle 11.JPG
Stone wall of Sannodan compound
Type Hirayama-style castle
Coordinates Latitude:
Longitude:
Built 13c-14c
Built by Unknown
Demolished 1591
Current
condition
ruins
Current
owner
Chōsokabe clan

Okō Castle (岡豊城 Okō-jō?) was a castle structure in Nankoku Kōchi Prefecture, Japan. Located on a 97-meter mountain. The site was designated a National Historic Site. It was the original base of power for the Chōsokabe clan who were feudal lords of Tosa Province and famous as the birthplace of the warlord Chōsokabe Motochika.[1][2][3]

History[]

The exact date of the castle's foundation is unknown but built in the Kamakura period.[1][4][5]

In 1508, Chōsokabe Kanetsugu came under attack by forces of local lords and he killed himself, his son Chōsokabe Kunichika narrowly escaped from the castle. Several years later Kunichika returned to the castle by Ichijō Fusaie`s help.[6]

In 1539, Chōsokabe Motochika was born in the castle.[6] Okō Castel was abandoned when Chōsokabe Motochika moved Chōsokabe clan's original base to Urato Castle in 1591.[1]

Current[]

The castle is now only ruins, with low some stone walls, moats, and earthworks. Kōchi Prefectural Museum of History is on site. At the museum excavated artefacts from the castle are exhibited.[1]

The castle was listed as one of the Continued Top 100 Japanese Castles in 2017.[7]

Gallery[]

See also[]

  • List of historic sites of Japan (Kōchi)

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "国史跡 岡豊城" (in Japanese). 高知県立歴史民俗資料館. http://www.kochi-bunkazaidan.or.jp/~rekimin/okou/castle.html. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  2. "岡豊城" (in Japanese). 南国市観光協会. http://www.nankoku-kankou.jp/life/dtl.php?hdnKey=505. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  3. "岡豊城跡" (in Japanese). じゃらん. https://www.jalan.net/kankou/spt_39204af2170018602/. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  4. "岡豊城" (in Japanese). 攻城団. https://cmeg.jp/w/castles/8541. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  5. "国史跡 岡豊城" (in Japanese). Nankoku city official. https://www.city.nankoku.lg.jp/life/life_dtl.php?hdnKey=1137. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 "長宗我部 国親" (in Japanese). 戦国ヒストリー. https://sengoku-his.com/611. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 
  7. "続日本100名城" (in Japanese). 日本城郭協会. http://jokaku.jp/japan-top-100-castles/best-100-castles-of-japan-2nd-selection/. Retrieved 25 July 2019. 

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