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Jim Sévellec[1][2](21 January 1897 – 21 May 1971), born Eugène Sévellec, was a French painter.

Life[]

Eugène Sévellec was born at Camaret-sur-Mer. He grew up in an artistic colony around Symbolist poet Saint-Pol-Roux and drew the life of the port whilst very young. Under the influence of the Saint-Pol-Roux, he left for Paris to train under painter Louis-Marie Désiré-Lucas. [3] From 1916 he was mobilised in the infantry and served among others as an interpreter for American and Scottish troops. From 1928 he collaborated with the Henriot factory, a faïencerie de Quimper. [4]

In 1936 he was made peintre de la Marine. [5]

He also created dioramas of Brest, France for the Musée de la Tour Tanguy. [6]

He died at Brest, France.

Works[]

  • Brest: Son histoire et son rôle dans la vie de la Basse-Bretagne, Jim and Joël Sévellec, Brest, 1955

Notes[]

  1. Nickname he was given by Scottish or American troops during the First World War, as easier to pronounce than Eugène - Filyg, Jeffdelonge. "Rue Jim Sévellec". Wiki-Brest. http://www.wiki-brest.net/index.php/S%C3%A9vellec,_Jim. Retrieved 29 July 2008. 
  2. He generally signed himself Jim E. Sévellec
  3. Bruno D. Cot (25 September 2003). "Les Sevellec - La peinture dans le sang". L'Express.fr. http://www.lexpress.fr/region/la-peinture-dans-le-sang_480450.html. 
  4. Marc-Antoine Ruzette (January 2005). "Biographie Sévellec". Quimper Enchères. http://quimper-encheres.site.voila.fr/page4.html. 
  5. "List of painters since 1830". Marine Nationale. http://www.defense.gouv.fr/marine/base/dossiers/dossier_les_peintres_de_la_marine/liste_des_peintres_depuis_1830__1. Retrieved 30 July 2008. [dead link]
  6. "Le Musée de la Tour Tanguy". Ville de Brest. Archived from the original on 17 April 2008. https://web.archive.org/web/20080417014426/http://www.mairie-brest.fr/brest/tour_tanguy.htm. Retrieved 30 July 2008. 

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