Military Wiki
Advertisement
Japanese submarine Ro-32
Career (Japan)
Name: Submarine No. 71
Builder: Kawasaki, Kobe, Japan
Laid down: 24 October 1921
Launched: 19 March 1923
Completed: 31 May 1924
Commissioned: 31 May 1924
Renamed: Ro-32 on 1 November 1924
Decommissioned: 15 December 1938
Struck: 1 April 1942
Fate:
  • Hulked 1 April 1942
  • Scrapped ca. August 1945
General characteristics
Class & type: Kaichū type submarine (K5 subclass)
Displacement:
  • 866 tonnes (852 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,047 tonnes (1,030 long tons) submerged
Length: 74.22 m (243 ft 6 in) overall
Beam: 6.12 m (20 ft 1 in)
Draft: 3.73 m (12 ft 3 in)
Installed power:
  • 1,200 bhp (890 kW) (diesel)
  • 1,200 hp (890 kW) (electric motor)
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • 2 × Sulzer Mark I diesel engine, 143 tons fuel
  • 2 × electric motor
  • Speed:
  • 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) surfaced
  • 8.5 knots (15.7 km/h; 9.8 mph) submerged
  • Range:
  • 9,000 nmi (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 85 nmi (157 km; 98 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
  • Test depth: 45.7 m (150 ft)
    Crew: 44
    Armament:

    Ro-32, originally named Submarine No. 71, was an Imperial Japanese Navy Kaichu-Type submarine of the Kaichu V (Toku Chu) subclass. She was in commission from 1924 to 1938, seeing service in the waters of Formosa and Japan, then served as a stationary training hulk during World War II.

    Design and description

    The submarines of the Kaichu V sub-class were designed for anti-shipping operations and carried more fuel and had greater range and a heavier gun armament than preceding Kaichu-type submarines. They displaced 866 tonnes (852 long tons) surfaced and 1,036 tonnes (1,020 long tons) submerged. The submarines were 74.22 meters (243 ft 6 in) long and had a beam of 6.12 meters (20 ft 1 in) and a draft of 3.73 meters (12 ft 3 in). They had a diving depth of 45.7 meters (150 ft).

    For surface running, the submarines were powered by two 600-brake-horsepower (447 kW) Sulzer diesel engines, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 600-horsepower (447 kW) electric motor. They could reach 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) on the surface and 8.5 knots (15.7 km/h; 9.8 mph) underwater. On the surface, they had a range of 9,000 nautical miles (17,000 km; 10,000 mi) — although the Imperial Japanese Navy officially announced it as 6,000 nautical miles (11,000 km; 6,900 mi) — at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph); submerged, they had a range of 85 nmi (157 km; 98 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph).

    The submarines were armed with four internal bow 533 mm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes and carried a total of eight torpedoes. They were also armed with a single 120 mm (4.7 in) deck gun and one 6.5 mm machine gun.

    Construction and commissioning

    Ro-32 was laid down as Submarine No. 71 on 24 October 1921 by Kawasaki at Kobe, Japan.[1] Launched on 19 March 1923,[1] she was completed and commissioned on 31 May 1924.[1]

    Service history

    Upon commissioning, Submarine No. 71 was attached to the Sasebo Naval District, to which she remained attached throughout her active career.[1] On 15 June 1924, she was assigned to both Submarine Division 25 — in which she spent her active career — and the Mako Defense Division headquartered at Mako off Formosa.[1] She was renamed Ro-32 on 1 November 1924.[1] On 1 December 1926, she was reassigned to the Sasebo Defense Division, headquartered at Sasebo, Japan.[1] Her service in the Sasebo Defense Division ended on 15 November 1934, after which she served as a unit of Submarine Division 25 in the Sasebo Naval District.[1] Ro-32 was decommissioned and placed in the Fourth Reserve on 15 December 1938.[1] The Japanese struck her from the Navy list on 1 April 1942,[1] and that day she became a stationary training hulk at the submarine school at Ōtake, Japan.[1] She was scrapped ca. August 1945.[1]

    Notes

    References

    • "Rekishi Gunzō". http://rekigun.net/. , History of Pacific War Vol.17 I-Gō Submarines, Gakken (Japan), January 1998, ISBN 4-05-601767-0
    • Rekishi Gunzō, History of Pacific War Extra, "Perfect guide, The submarines of the Imperial Japanese Forces", Gakken (Japan), March 2005, ISBN 4-05-603890-2
    • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.43 Japanese Submarines III, Ushio Shobō (Japan), September 1980, Book code 68343-44
    • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.132 Japanese Submarines I "Revised edition", Ushio Shobō (Japan), February 1988, Book code 68344-36
    • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.133 Japanese Submarines II "Revised edition", Ushio Shobō (Japan), March 1988, Book code 68344-37
    • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.135 Japanese Submarines IV, Ushio Shobō (Japan), May 1988, Book code 68344-39


    This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
    Advertisement