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Japanese submarine I-24
Career (Empire of Japan) Naval Ensign of Japan.svg
Builder: Sasebo Naval Arsenal
Laid down: 5 December 1938
Launched: 31 October 1941
Commissioned: Sasebo, Japan on 31 October 1941
Struck: 1 August 1943
Fate: Sunk 11 June 1943
General characteristics
Class & type: Type C submarine
Displacement: 2,554 long tons (2,595 t) surfaced
3,561 long tons (3,618 t) submerged
Length: 358 ft 7 in (109.30 m)
Beam: 29 ft 10 in (9.09 m)
Draft: 17 ft 7 in (5.36 m)
Propulsion: 2 × Kampon Mk.2 Model 10 diesel engines, 12,400 hp (9,200 kW)
2 electric motors, 2,000 hp (1,500 kW)
Speed: 23.6 knots (43.7 km/h; 27.2 mph) surfaced
8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range: 14,000 nmi (26,000 km; 16,000 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) (surfaced)
60 nmi (110 km; 69 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) (submerged)
Boats & landing
craft carried:
1 × Ko-hyoteki midget submarine
Complement: 95 officers and men
Armament: 8 × 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes
20 × Type 95 torpedoes
2 × Type 96 25mm AA guns
1 × 14 cm/40 11th Year Type naval gun[1]
Aircraft carried: None

I-24 was an Imperial Japanese Navy submarine that saw service during the Pacific Campaign of World War II. I-24 was commissioned at Sasebo, Japan on 31 October 1941. She participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor as the mother ship of a midget submarine piloted by Ensign Kazuo Sakamaki, who became the first Japanese prisoner of war when his boat washed up on the shore of Oahu some time after the attack. I-24 also took part in the Battle of the Coral Sea and attack on Sydney Harbour in May and June 1942. I-24 was depth-charged, rammed, and sunk with all hands (104 officers and men) by the United States Navy subchaser USS Larchmont (PC-487) at 53°16′N 174°24′E / 53.267°N 174.4°E / 53.267; 174.4 near Shemya, Alaska on 11 June 1943.

References

  1. Campbell, John (1985). Naval Weapons of World War Two. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press. p. 191. ISBN 0-87021-459-4. 


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