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Japanese destroyer Take (1944)
Japanese destroyer Take 1944.jpg
Take, 30 May 1944
Career (Empire of Japan)
Name: Take
Namesake: Bamboo
Builder: Yokosuka Naval Arsenal
Laid down: 15 October 1943
Launched: 28 March 1944
Completed: 16 June 1944
Struck: 25 October 1945
Fate: Turned over to Great Britain 16 July 1947, scrapped
General characteristics (as built)
Class & type: Matsu-class escort destroyer
Displacement: 1,282 t (1,262 long tons) (standard)
Length: 100 m (328 ft 1 in) (o/a)
Beam: 9.35 m (30 ft 8 in)
Draft: 3.3 m (10 ft 10 in)
Installed power: 2 × water-tube boilers; 19,000 shp (14,000 kW)
Propulsion: 2 shafts, 2 × geared steam turbines
Speed: 27.8 knots (51.5 km/h; 32.0 mph)
Range: 4,680 nmi (8,670 km; 5,390 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Complement: 210
Sensors and
processing systems:
Armament:
  • 1 × twin, 1 × single 127 mm (5 in) DP guns
  • 4 × triple, 13 × single 25 mm (1 in) AA guns
  • 1 × quadruple 610 mm (24 in) torpedo tubes
  • 2 × rails, 2 × throwers for 36 depth charges
  • Take (?, "Bamboo") was one of 18 Matsu-class escort destroyers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

    Completed on 6 June 1944, Take was assigned to Desron 11 of the Combined Fleet for a month's training, then was assigned to convoy escort duties.

    On 3 December, Take was in Ormoc Bay, escorting convoy TA-7 while it landed reinforcements from Manila. Three American destroyers swept in just after midnight in an attempt to destroy the convoy; the ensuing battle saw Take's sister ship Kuwa sunk by gunfire and Take driven off with moderate damage, however in return the USS Cooper was hit by torpedoes and sunk.

    Take would continue performing escort duties for the remainder of the war, and was in Maizuru for the Surrender of Japan.

    Immediately postwar, Take was used as a repatriation ship. In 1947, she was turned over to Great Britain and then scrapped.

    Bibliography

    • Chesneau, Roger, ed (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7. 
    • Jentschura, Hansgeorg; Jung, Dieter; Mickel, Peter (1977). Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1869–1945. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 0-87021-893-X. 
    • Nevitt, Allyn D. (1998). "IJN Take: Tabular Record of Movement". http://www.combinedfleet.com/take_t.htm. Retrieved 21 September 2020. 
    • Rohwer, Jürgen (2005). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939–1945: The Naval History of World War Two (Third Revised ed.). Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. 
    • Stille, Mark (2013). Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919–45 (2): Asahio to Tachibana Classes. Botley, UK: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84908-987-6. 
    • Whitley, M. J. (1988). Destroyers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-326-1. 

    External links


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