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January 2016 Iraq attacks
Part of Iraqi Civil War (2014–present)
Location Baghdad and Miqdadiyah, Iraq
Date 11 January 2016
Target Shia civilians in Al-Jawhara shopping mall
Weapons Car bombs, mass murder, suicide bombing
Deaths 132 (including the 6 perpetrators)
Assailants Islamic State of Iraq and Syria


On 11 January 2016, a series of terrorist attacks occurred in Baghdad and Miqdadiyah, Iraq. The attack resulted in 132 people being killed, including the six attackers.

Events

At least 12 people were killed in an attack on the Al-Jawhara shopping mall in Baghdad after a car bomb exploded outside. Hostages were taken by six gunmen in the incident. At least 19 people were injured.[1]

A double blast at a cafe north of the Iraqi capital claimed another 20 lives in the late afternoon in the town of Muqdadiyah northeast of Baghdad. A suicide bomber detonated an explosives-rigged vehicle after people gathered at the scene. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) claimed the attack and named the suicide bomber as Abu Abdallah, an Iraqi. The security officers said that Shiites set alight several Sunni homes and a mosque following the attack.[2]

Two huge bomb blasts, one at a tea shop and the other at a mosque, killed at least 100 people in the township of Sharaban in Iraq's northern Diyala province. The first blast went off at a tea shop in the neighborhood of Asri and the second one targeted Nazanda Khatun Mosque while the prayers were going on. The second blast went off after security forces and people arrived to the scene. ISIL claimed responsibility for the explosions shortly after it took place.[3]

Reaction

  • The attack gained attention after a survivor posted his account of the attacks and the victims on the website Reddit.[4]
  •  Turkey: Foreign Ministry statemented condemning terrorist attacks, expressed condolences for deaths and ‘the friendly and brotherly people of Iraq’. And said they will be resolutely remaining to support Iraq's fight against terrorism.[5]

References

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