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The Admiralty purchased ''Jason'' when the [[Napoleonic Wars]] broke out. After the [[Treaty of Amiens]], Britain had disarmed while France rearmed so on the resumption of war the Admiralty found itself short of vessels for convoy escort. Because of the urgency of the situation, the Admiralty purchased twenty such (three-masted) mercantile vessels; among them they took ''Jason'' into service with her original masts and yards even though she was under-canvassed and therefore slow, and without a cargo in her hold tended to roll; she became HMS ''Heron''.
 
The Admiralty purchased ''Jason'' when the [[Napoleonic Wars]] broke out. After the [[Treaty of Amiens]], Britain had disarmed while France rearmed so on the resumption of war the Admiralty found itself short of vessels for convoy escort. Because of the urgency of the situation, the Admiralty purchased twenty such (three-masted) mercantile vessels; among them they took ''Jason'' into service with her original masts and yards even though she was under-canvassed and therefore slow, and without a cargo in her hold tended to roll; she became HMS ''Heron''.
   
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She was commissioned in June 1804 under Commander John Edgecombe. At the end of the year he escorted a convoy of merchantmen from England to Barbados. Once in Barbados Edgecombe faced a dilemma. On the one hand there were reports of an enemy fleet in the Windward Isles that could threaten Barbados. On the other hand, a fleet of 28 merchantmen and two transports had gathered in Carlisle Bay, awaiting a warship to escort them to Halifax or Britain. Edgecombe decided to escort the convoy, risking court martial for leaving his duty station without orders. Five of the ships parted company for Halifax. {{HMS|Argus|1799|2}}, off Cape Clear, met six others that were going up the St. Georges Channel. ''Heron'' accompanied the remainder to the Downs, where the convoy arrived on 2 August 1805. The captains of the 19 vessels that Edgecombe had convoyed signed a letter, interceding with the Admiralty on his behalf. The letter proved moot as the Admiralty had already approved Edgecombe's actions.
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She was commissioned in June 1804 under Commander John Edgecombe. At the end of the year he escorted a convoy of merchantmen from England to Barbados. Once in Barbados Edgecombe faced a dilemma. On the one hand there were reports of an enemy fleet in the Windward Isles that could threaten Barbados. On the other hand, a fleet of 28 merchantmen and two transports had gathered in Carlisle Bay, awaiting a warship to escort them to [[City of Halifax|Halifax]] or Britain. Edgecombe decided to escort the convoy, risking court martial for leaving his duty station without orders. Five of the ships parted company for Halifax. {{HMS|Argus|1799|2}}, off Cape Clear, met six others that were going up the St. Georges Channel. ''Heron'' accompanied the remainder to the Downs, where the convoy arrived on 2 August 1805. The captains of the 19 vessels that Edgecombe had convoyed signed a letter, interceding with the Admiralty on his behalf. The letter proved moot as the Admiralty had already approved Edgecombe's actions.
   
 
Edgecombe realized that ''Heron'' was too slow to catch enemy cruisers; instead he decided to use guile. While she was sailing to Antigua with a convoy he noticed a schooner approaching. He hoisted American colours and dressed a midshipman as a woman.
 
Edgecombe realized that ''Heron'' was too slow to catch enemy cruisers; instead he decided to use guile. While she was sailing to Antigua with a convoy he noticed a schooner approaching. He hoisted American colours and dressed a midshipman as a woman.
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*[[British Warships in the Age of Sail|''British Warships in the Age of Sail 1793-1817: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates'']]. Rif Winfield. 2nd edition, Seaforth Publishing, 2008. ISBN 978-1-84415-717-4.
 
*[[British Warships in the Age of Sail|''British Warships in the Age of Sail 1793-1817: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates'']]. Rif Winfield. 2nd edition, Seaforth Publishing, 2008. ISBN 978-1-84415-717-4.
 
* ''The Great Gamble'', [[Dudley Pope]]; Simon & Schuster, New York, 1972. ISBN 0-671-21404-7
 
* ''The Great Gamble'', [[Dudley Pope]]; Simon & Schuster, New York, 1972. ISBN 0-671-21404-7
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{{Wikipedia|HMS Volcano (1804)}}
 
   
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Volcano}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Volcano}}
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[[Category:Bomb vessels]]
 
[[Category:Bomb vessels]]
 
[[Category:War of 1812 ships of the United Kingdom]]
 
[[Category:War of 1812 ships of the United Kingdom]]
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{{Wikipedia|HMS Volcano (1804)}}

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