Military Wiki
Advertisement
German submarine U-2 (1935)
U-2 in Kiel 1935.JPG
U-2 in Kiel, in 1935
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: U-2
Ordered: 2 February 1935
Builder: Deutsche Werke, Kiel[1]
Cost: 1,500,000 Reichsmark[1]
Yard number: 237[1]
Laid down: 11 February 1935[2]
Launched: 1 June 1935[3]
Commissioned: 25 June 1935[3]
Struck: 9 April 1944
Fate: Sunk after a collision west of Pillau, 8 April 1944[3]
General characteristics
Class & type: IIA
Type: Coastal submarine
Displacement: 254 t (250 long tons) ↑[1]
303 t (298 long tons) ↓[1]
Length: 40.9 m (134 ft 2 in)[1]
Beam: 4.08 m (13 ft 5 in)[1]
Draft: 3.83 m (12 ft 7 in)[1]
Propulsion: 2 × propeller shafts
2 × MWM four-stroke diesel engines, 700 shp (520 kW)[1]
2 × Siemens-Schuckert electric motor, 360 shp (270 kW)[1]
Speed: 13 knots (24 km/h) ↑[1]
6.9 knots (12.8 km/h) ↓[1]
Range: 1,050 nautical miles (1,940 km; 1,210 mi) @ 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) ↑[1]
35 nmi (65 km; 40 mi) @ 4 knots ↓[1]
Test depth: 80 m (260 ft)[1]
Complement: 3 officers, 22 men[1]
Armament: 3 × 53.3 cm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes[1]
5 × torpedoes
1 × 2 cm (0.79 in) C/30 anti-aircraft gun[1]
Service record
Part of: Kriegsmarine
U-Boat Training Flotilla
21st U-boat Flotilla
Identification codes: M 27 610
Commanders: Oblt. Hermann Michahelles
(25 July 1935–30 September 1936)
Kptlt. Heinrich Liebe
(1 October 1936–31 January 1938)
Oblt. Herbert Schultze
(31 January–16 March 1938)
Kptlt. Helmut Rosenbaum
(17 March 1939–5 August 1940)
Oblt. Hans Heidtmann
(7 July–5 August 1940) (deputy)
Kptlt. Georg von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff
(6 August–October 1941)
Karl Kölzer
(October 1941–15 May 1942)
Oblt. Werner Schwaff
(16 May–19 November 1942)
Oblt. Helmut Herglotz
(20 November–12 December 1943)
Oblt. Wolfgang Schwarzkopf
(13 December 1943–8 April 1944)
Operations: Two:
1st patrol:
15–29 March 1940
2nd patrol:
4–8 April 1940
Victories: No ships sunk or damaged

German submarine U-2 was a Type IIA U-boat of the German Kriegsmarine. Her keel was laid down 11 February 1935 by Deutsche Werke of Kiel as 'Werk' 237; she was launched on 1 July and commissioned on 25 July 1935 with Oberleutnant zur See (Oblt.) Hermann Michahelles in command.

Service history

She had several commanders over her long career. Michahelles was relieved on 30 September 1936, by Kapitänleutnant (Kptlt.) Heinrich Liebe. Liebe turned command over on 31 January 1938 to Oblt. Herbert Schultze. On 16 March 1939, Kptlt. Helmut Rosenbaum assumed command and on 7 July 1940, Oblt. Hans Heidtmann joined Rosenbaum as deputy commander. On 6 August 1940, Georg von Wilamowitz-Moellendorf relieved Rosenbaum and Heidtmann and commanded until October 1941 when Karl Kölzer took over. On 16 May 1942, Oblt. Werner Schwaff relieved Kölzer, and on 20 November 1942, was relieved by Oblt. Helmut Herglotz. On 12 December 1943, Oblt. Wolfgang Schwarzkopf took over and commanded the boat until she was lost.

She was used as a school boat and trainer for her entire career except for two completely uneventful combat patrols in early 1940.

Fate

U-2 suffered no casualties to any of her numerous crews until 8 April 1944 when she collided with the German steam trawler Helmi Söhle[Note 1] west of Pillau (today's Baltiysk, Russia) and sank. Seventeen of her crew died; 18 survived. The wreck was raised the next day and stricken.

Notes

  1. Gröner names the vessel involved in the collision as Hinrich Freese, which according to other sources had already sunk on 16 November 1940 [1].

References

Bibliography

  • Gröner, Erich (1985). U-Boote, Hilfskreuzer, Minenschiffe, Netzleger, Sperrbrecher. III. Koblenz: Bernhard&Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-4802-4. 
  • Sharpe, Peter (1998). U-Boat Fact File. Great Britain: Midland Publishing. ISBN 1-85780-072-9. 
  • Rössler, Eberhard (1979). U-Bootbau bis Ende des 1. Weltkrieges, Konstruktionen für das Ausland und die Jahre 1935 - 1945. I. Munich: Bernhard&Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-5213-7. 

External links

See also


Coordinates: 54°48′00″N 19°55′01″E / 54.800°N 19.917°E / 54.800; 19.917


This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Advertisement