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German submarine U-128 (1941)
U-128 17-5-43.jpg
Air attack on U-128
Career (Germany)
Name: U-128
Ordered: 7 August 1939
Builder: AG Weser in Bremen
Laid down: 10 July 1940
Launched: 20 February 1941
Commissioned: 12 May 1941 by Ulrich Heyse
Fate: Sunk, 17 May 1943
General characteristics
Type: Type IXC submarine
Displacement: 1,120 t (1,100 long tons) surfaced
1,232 t (1,213 long tons) submerged
Length: 76.8 m (252 ft 0 in) overall
58.7 m (192 ft 7 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.8 m (22 ft 4 in) overall
4.4 m (14 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.4 m (30 ft 10 in)
Draft: 4.7 m (15 ft 5 in)
Propulsion: 2 × MAN M9V40/46 supercharged 9-cylinder diesel engines, 4,000 hp (2,983 kW)
2 × SSW GU345/34 double-acting electric motors, 1,000 hp (746 kW)
Speed: 18.2 knots (33.7 km/h) surfaced
7.3 knots (13.5 km/h) submerged
Range: 24,880 nmi (46,080 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) surfaced
117 nmi (217 km) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Complement: 48 to 56
Armament: 6 × torpedo tubes (four bow, two stern)
22 × 55 cm (22 in) torpedoes
1 × 10.5 cm SK C/32 naval gun[1] (110 rounds)

German submarine U-128 was a Type IXC U-boat of the Nazi German Kriegsmarine during World War II. She was sunk 17 May 1943, by American action.

History

Ordered on 7 August 1939 from AG Weser in Bremen, U-128 was laid down on 10 July 1940, launched on 20 February 1941 and commissioned by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse on 12 May 1941.

The boat was a training vessel in the second flotilla until 30 November 1941 based in Wilhelmshaven. She was then based in Lorient.

During her six completed war patrols, U-128 sank 12 ships, for a total of 83,639 tons. On 1 March 1943 command was transferred to Kptlt. Hermann Steinert, who commanded her until her loss a few months later.

Fate

On 17 May 1943, while operating in the South Atlantic near Pernambuco, two Mariner flying boats, PBM 74-P5 and PBM-74-P6 of the US Navy Squadron VP-74, made U-128 surface with depth charges. Two US Navy destroyers (USS Jouett and Moffett) also hit her with 5-inch gunfire. The crew opened the submarine's seacocks as they abandoned ship, scuttling the submarine. The final toll was seven dead but there were 47 survivors.

Raiding career

Date Ship Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Position Deaths
19 February 1942 Pan Massachusetts United States 8,202 28°27′N 80°08′W / 28.45°N 80.133°W / 28.45; -80.133 20
22 February 1942 Cities Service Empire United States 8,103 28°25′N 80°02′W / 28.417°N 80.033°W / 28.417; -80.033 14
5 March 1942 O.A. Knudsen Norway 11,007 26°17′N 75°50′W / 26.283°N 75.833°W / 26.283; -75.833 2
13 May 1942 Denpark United Kingdom 3,491 22°28′N 28°10′W / 22.467°N 28.167°W / 22.467; -28.167 21
8 June 1942 South Africa Norway 9,234 12°47′N 49°44′W / 12.783°N 49.733°W / 12.783; -49.733 6
21 June 1942 West Ira United States 5,681 12°28′N 57°05′W / 12.467°N 57.083°W / 12.467; -57.083 1
23 June 1942 Andrea Brøvig Norway 10,173 12°10′N 59°10′W / 12.167°N 59.167°W / 12.167; -59.167 0
27 June 1942 Polybius United States 7,041 10°55′N 57°40′W / 10.917°N 57.667°W / 10.917; -57.667 10
8 November 1942 Maloja Norway 6,400 11°58′N 27°08′W / 11.967°N 27.133°W / 11.967; -27.133 2
10 November 1942 Cerinthus United Kingdom 3,878 12°27′N 27°45′W / 12.45°N 27.75°W / 12.45; -27.75 20
10 November 1942 Start Point United Kingdom 5,293 13°12′N 27°27′W / 13.2°N 27.45°W / 13.2; -27.45 2
5 December 1942 Teesbank United Kingdom 5,136 03°33′N 29°35′W / 3.55°N 29.583°W / 3.55; -29.583 1

References

Notes

  1. Campbell, John Naval Weapons of World War Two ISBN 0-87021-459-4 pp.248&249

External links

See also



Coordinates: 10°00′00″N 35°34′59″W / 10.000°N 35.583°W / 10.000; -35.583

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