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German submarine U-100 (1940)
U100.jpg
Career
Name: U-100
Ordered: 15 December 1937
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Yard number: 594
Laid down: 22 May 1939
Launched: 10 April 1940
Commissioned: 30 May 1940
Fate: Sunk, 17 March 1941 by British warships
General characteristics
Class & type: Type VIIB U-boat
Displacement: Surfaced 753 tons tons
submerged 857 tons
Length: Overall 66.6 m (218 ft 6 in)
pressure hull 48.8 m (160 ft 1 in)
Beam: Overall 6.2 m (20 ft 4 in)
pressure hull 4.7 m (15 ft 5 in)
Draught: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Propulsion: Surfaced: two supercharged MAN, 6 cylinder, 4-stroke M6V 40/46 diesels totalling 2,800 - 3,200bhp(2,400 kW). Max rpm: 470-490.
Speed: Surfaced 17.9 knots (33 km/h)
submerged eight knots (15 km/h)
Range: Surfaced: 16,095 km (8,691 nmi)
submerged: 175 km (109 mi)
Test depth: 230 m (754 ft). Calculated crush depth: 250-295 m (820-967 ft)
Complement: 44 to 48 officers and ratings
Armament: • 5 × 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes: four bow, one stern
• 14 × torpedoes or 26 TMA mines
• 1 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) deck gun with 220 rounds
• 1 × C30 20 mm AA
Service record
Part of: Kriegsmarine:
7th U-boat Flotilla
Commanders: Kptlt. Joachim Schepke
(30 May 1940–17 March 1941)
Operations: Six patrols
1st patrol:
9 August–1 September 1940
2nd patrol:
11–25 September 1940
3rd patrol:
12–23 October 1940
4th patrol:
7 –27 November 1940
5th patrol:
2 December 1940–1 January 1941
6th patrol:
9–17 March 1941
Victories: 25 ships sunk for a total of 135,614 gross register tons (GRT)
Four ships damaged for a total of 17,229 GRT
One ship a total loss of 2,205 GRT

German submarine U-100 was a Type VIIB U-boat of the Nazi German Kriegsmarine during World War II. She, given her short-lived existence, was one of the most successful and deadly U-Boats to have served in the conflict.[1]

Combat record

First patrol

The boat was launched on 10 April 1940, with a crew of 53, under the command of Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke. On her first active patrol, U-100 came into contact with two Allied convoys, OA-198 and OA-204. She shadowed both convoys with the following results:

  • 16 August 1940:
    • Sank the British 4,864 ton Empire Merchant, sailing with convoy OA-198
  • 25 August 1940:
    • Sank the British 5,471 ton Jamaica Pioneer
  • 29 August 1940:
    • Sank the Swedish 2,373 ton Alida Gorthon, a member of convoy OA-204
    • Sank the British 2,393 ton Astra II, part of convoy OA-204
    • Sank the British 4,608 ton Dalblair, from convoy OA-204
    • Damaged the British 5,498 ton Hartismere, sailing with convoy OA-204
    • Sank the British 6,103 ton Empire Moose, a member of convoy OA-204

Second patrol

U-100 departed for her second active patrol on 11 September 1940, coming into contact with the Allied convoy HX 72, with the following results:

  • 21 September 1940
    • Sank the British 4,608 ton Dalcairn
    • Sank the British 8,286 ton SS Canonesa
    • Sank the British 10,364 ton Torinia
  • 22 September 1940
    • Sank the British 3,940 ton Scholar
    • Sank the Norwegian 6,031 ton Simla
    • Sank the British 6,586 ton Empire Airman
    • Sank the British 10,525 ton Frederick S Fales

Third patrol

After resupplying, U-100 departed for her third active patrol on 12 October 1940. She came into contact with two Allied convoys, HX-79 and SC-7, with the following results:

  • 18 October 1940:
    • Damaged the Dutch 2,118 ton SS Boekelo, a member of convoy SC-7
    • Damaged the British 5,458 ton SS Shekatika, part of convoy SC-7
  • 19 October 1940:
    • Damaged the British 4,155 ton SS Blairspey, from convoy SC-7
  • 20 October 1940
    • Sank the British 5,452 ton Loch Lomond, sailing with convoy HX-79
    • Sank the British 6,218 ton Sitala, a member of convoy HX-79
    • Sank the British 8,230 ton Caprella, part of convoy HX-79

Fourth patrol

U-100 departed on her fourth patrol on 7 November 1940. On 22 November She came into contact with the Allied convoy SC-11 and began to shadow it with the following results:

  • 23 November 1940
    • Fatally damaged the Norwegian 2,205 ton Bruse
    • Sank the Norwegian 2,694 ton Salonica
    • Sank the British 3,136 ton Leise Mærsk
    • Sank the Dutch 3,628 ton Ootmarsum
    • Sank the Dutch 3,636 ton Bussum
    • Sank the British 4,562 ton Justitia
    • Sank the British 4,740 ton Bradfyne

Fifth patrol

U-100 left for her fifth active patrol on 2 December 1940, sinking two vessels from convoy OB-256, then a third solo vessel. They were:

  • 14 December 1940:
    • Sank the British ship Euphorbia, 3,380 tons, part of convoy OB-256
    • Sank the British ship Kyleglen, 3,670 tons, part of convoy OB-256
  • 18 December 1940:
    • Sank the British ship Napier Star, 10,116 tons

Sixth and final patrol

U-100 departed on her sixth and what would be her final patrol on 9 March 1941. She approached convoy HX 112 from astern in the pre-dawn hours of 17 March, but was detected at a range of 1,000 meters by the Type 286 RADAR aboard HMS Vanoc.[2] U-100 was the first U-boat to be so discovered during World War II; she was rammed and sunk by Vanoc while attempting to submerge.[3] Another destroyer, HMS Walker, was also present.[4] Six of the boat's 53 crew-members survived, spending the remainder of the war as POWs. Schepke was not one of them.[1].

References

Notes
  1. "Type VIIB U-100". ubootwaffe.net. http://ubootwaffe.net/ops/boat.cgi?boat=100. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  2. Rohwer & Hummelchen (1992) p.54
  3. Macintyre, Donald, CAPT RN "Shipborne Radar" United States Naval Institute Proceedings September 1967 pp.78-79
  4. http://uboat.net/boats/u100.htm
Bibliography
  • Rohwer, J. and Hummelchen, G. (1992). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939-1945. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-105-X. 

Further reading


Coordinates: 61°04′N 11°30′W / 61.067°N 11.5°W / 61.067; -11.5

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