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==History==
 
==History==
 
[[File:Funafuti International Airport terminal building.jpg|thumb|left|350px|Funafuti International Airport terminal building]]
 
[[File:Funafuti International Airport terminal building.jpg|thumb|left|350px|Funafuti International Airport terminal building]]
Funafuti Airport was built by [[United States Navy]] [[Seabee (US Navy)|Seabee]] construction battalions in 1943 during [[World War II]].<ref name="galvanic">{{cite web| title=To the Central Pacific and Tarawa, August 1943--Background to GALVANIC | date = Ch 16, p. 622 |url= http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ACTC/actc-16.html | accessdate=2010-09-03}}</ref>
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Funafuti Airport was built by [[United States Navy]] [[Seabee (US Navy)|Seabee]] construction battalions in 1943 during [[World War II]].<ref name="galvanic">{{cite web| title=To the Central Pacific and Tarawa, August 1943--Background to GALVANIC | date = Ch 16, p. 622 |url= http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/ACTC/actc-16.html | accessdate=2010-09-03}}</ref>
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The military airfield included an airstrip, control tower, facilities and radio station at [[Tepuka]], connected by cable to the airfield. The base headquarters buildings were at the present-day Teagai Apelu's residence, and a bunker is there to this day.
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The military airfield included an airstrip, control tower, facilities and radio station at [[Tepuka]], connected by cable to the airfield. The base headquarters buildings were at the present-day Teagai Apelu's residence, and a bunker is there to this day.
The first offensive operation was launched on 20 April 1943 when 22 [[B-24 Liberator]] aircraft from 371 and 372 Bombardment Squadrons bombed Nauru. The next day the Japanese made a predawn raid on the strip at Funafuti that destroyed one B-24 and caused damage to five other planes. On 22 April, 12 B-24 aircraft bombed [[Tarawa]].<ref name="AAF">{{cite web| last = James C. Olson, Wesley Frank Craven & James Lea Cate (Editors)| work= Army Air Forces in World War II: Vol. IV, The Pacific: Guadalcanal to Saipan - August 1942 to July 1944|title= Chapter 9, The Gilberts and Marshalls |date =|url= http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/IV/AAF-IV-9.html| accessdate=12 October 2013}}</ref> The airfield became the headquarters of the [[United States Army Air Forces]] [[VII Bomber Command]] in November 1943, directing operations against Japanese forces on [[Tarawa]] and other bases in the Gilbert Islands. The USAAF stationed two [[B-24 Liberator]] heavy bomber groups, the [[11th Wing]] and [[30th Operations Group|30th Bombardment Group]]s on Funafuti in the implementation of Operation Galvanic, which lead to the [[Battle of Tarawa]] and the [[Battle of Makin]] in November 1943.<ref name="AAF"/>
 
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The first offensive operation was launched on 20 April 1943 when 22 [[B-24 Liberator]] aircraft from 371 and 372 Bombardment Squadrons bombed Nauru. The next day the Japanese made a predawn raid on the strip at Funafuti that destroyed one B-24 and caused damage to five other planes. On 22 April, 12 B-24 aircraft bombed [[Tarawa]].<ref name="AAF">{{cite web| last = James C. Olson, Wesley Frank Craven & James Lea Cate (Editors)| work= Army Air Forces in World War II: Vol. IV, The Pacific: Guadalcanal to Saipan - August 1942 to July 1944|title= Chapter 9, The Gilberts and Marshalls |date =|url= http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/IV/AAF-IV-9.html| accessdate=12 October 2013}}</ref> The airfield became the headquarters of the [[United States Army Air Forces]] [[VII Bomber Command]] in November 1943, directing operations against Japanese forces on [[Tarawa]] and other bases in the Gilbert Islands. The USAAF stationed two [[B-24 Liberator]] heavy bomber groups, the [[11th Wing]] and [[30th Operations Group|30th Bombardment Group]]s on Funafuti in the implementation of Operation Galvanic, which lead to the [[Battle of Tarawa]] and the [[Battle of Makin]] in November 1943.<ref name="AAF"/>
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By the middle of 1944, as the fighting moved further north toward Japan, the Americans began to withdraw. By the time the [[Pacific War]] ended in 1945, nearly all of them, with their equipment, departed.<ref>{{Air Force Historical Research Agency}}</ref><ref>Maurer, Maurer (1983). Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-89201-092-4.</ref><ref>[http://www.pacificwrecks.com www.pacificwrecks.com]</ref> After the war, the military airfield was developed into a commercial airport.
 
By the middle of 1944, as the fighting moved further north toward Japan, the Americans began to withdraw. By the time the [[Pacific War]] ended in 1945, nearly all of them, with their equipment, departed.<ref>{{Air Force Historical Research Agency}}</ref><ref>Maurer, Maurer (1983). Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-89201-092-4.</ref><ref>[http://www.pacificwrecks.com www.pacificwrecks.com]</ref> After the war, the military airfield was developed into a commercial airport.
   
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* {{ASN|FUN}}
 
* {{ASN|FUN}}
   
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<!--Navigation box--><br />
 
{{Wikipedia|Funafuti International Airport}}
 
{{Wikipedia|Funafuti International Airport}}
   

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