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Emirau Airport
IATA: EMI – ICAO:
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Summary
Location Emirau Island, Papua New Guinea
Elevation AMSL 100 ft / 30 m
Coordinates 1°38.5′S 149°58.5′E / 1.6417°S 149.975°E / -1.6417; 149.975
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
12/30 1,455 4,773
Source: PNG Airstrip Guide[1]

Emirau Airport is an airfield in Emirau Island, Papua New Guinea.[1]

History

World War II

Emirau Airfield
Emirau Island
Corsairs on Emirau.jpg
F4Us on Emirau
Type Military Airfield
Coordinates Latitude:
Longitude:
Built 1944
Built by Seebees
Construction
materials
Coral
In use 1944-present
Controlled by United States Marine Corps
Royal New Zealand Air Force

Emirau was seized unopposed by two Battalions of the 4th Marine Division on 20 March 1944.[2] Naval Construction Battalions arrived shortly after the landings and began construction of two coral-surfaced 7,000 feet (2,100 m) by 150 feet (46 m) airfields on the island. Inshore Airfield had 35 double hardstands capable of parking 210 fighter or light-bomber planes, while North Cape Airfield had 42 hardstands with space for parking 84 heavy bombers. Both were fully equipped with towers, lighting, and a dispensary. The aviation tank farm consisted of three 1,000 barrels (~140 t) tanks and nineteen 1,000 barrels (~140 t) together with the appropriate filling and distribution points. A reserve of 40,000 barrels (~5,500 t) was stored in drums.[3] Emirau was the staging point for attacks on the Japanese strongholds at Rabaul and Kavieng.

US Marine Corps units based here included:

Royal New Zealand Air Force units based here included:[8]

There was also one Australian unit located on the island - the 474 Heavy Anti-aircraft Troop.

Base roll-up commenced in December 1944 and was completed by May 1945.[3]

Postwar

The runways remain usable.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 PNG Airstrip Guide. August 2005.
  2. Building the Navy's Bases in World War II History of the Bureau of Yards and Docks and the Civil Engineer Corps 1940-1946. US Government Printing Office. 1947. p. 303. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Bases, p.304
  4. http://www.vmb413.com/
  5. http://www.vmb433.com/
  6. http://www.vmb443.com/
  7. http://www.vmb611.com/
  8. "Royal New Zealand Air Force Operations from Emirau". http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz//tm/scholarly/tei-WH2AirF-c19-8.html. Retrieved 12 June 2013. 

External links

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