Military Wiki
Advertisement

Professor David B. Cline, 1983

David Cline and family: David is on the right in one of the Hawaiian shirts he favored. brother-in-laws, Jim Warner and George Stolte stand on either side of Dave's first cousin, Donald Cline.

David Bruce Cline (December 7, 1933 – June 27, 2015) was an American particle physicist known for his contributions to the discovery of neutral currents and the weak intermediate bosons.[1]

Early life and education

Cline was born in Rosedale, Kansas. After being discharged from the Army, he attended Kansas State University, where he graduated with a BS and MS in physics.[2] Cline earned his Ph.D. in 1965 at the University of Wisconsin under the supervision of William Fry.

Career

In 1967, Cline was appointed to the faculty at the University of Wisconsin in 1967.[3] With Alfred E. Mann of the University of Pennsylvania and Carlo Rubbia of Harvard he produced a document that launched the first neutrino experiment using the new Fermilab accelerator complex.[4] After a period of controversy, Cline and collaborators agreed with the claim coming from the CERN laboratory in Geneva that certain neutrino interactions required the existence of weak neutral currents.[5]

In 1976 Cline, Rubbia and Peter McIntyre made a proposal to use existing proton accelerators to make antiprotons and collide them head-on with protons to produce the W and Z intermediate bosons.[6][7] Cline was part of the experiment that made their discovery in 1983 at CERN which first implemented the scheme they proposed in 1976.[8] Later Cline was also a member of the Fermilab experiment that discovered the top quark and of one of the CERN experiment that discovered the Higgs boson in 2012.[9]

In 1986,[when?] Cline moved from Wisconsin to UCLA where he was a distinguished professor of Physics and Astronomy and launched new world-class efforts in particle astrophysics and accelerator physics.[10] At UCLA he was also one of the pioneers of the use of liquefied noble gases as particle detectors and made innovative contributions to the development of the use of liquid argon and xenon to detect dark matter.[11]

Personal life

David Cline with his daughter Daphne and friend Helena in the 1970s.

David Cline married twice. He died on June 27, 2015 at UCLA Medical Center, following a heart attack on campus the previous afternoon. He is survived by five children and eight grandchildren.[12]

References

  1. Cousins, Robert D.; Rosenzweig, James B. (2016). "David Bruce Cline". pp. 69–70. Bibcode 2016PhT....69g..69C. Digital object identifier:10.1063/pt.3.3243. 
  2. "David B. Cline | UCLA Physics & Astronomy". http://www.pa.ucla.edu/content/david-b-cline. 
  3. Cousins, Robert D.; Rosenzweig, James B. (2016). "David Bruce Cline". pp. 69–70. Bibcode 2016PhT....69g..69C. Digital object identifier:10.1063/PT.3.3243. ISSN 0031-9228. 
  4. Cousins, Robert D.; Rosenzweig, James B. (2016). "David Bruce Cline". pp. 69–70. Bibcode 2016PhT....69g..69C. Digital object identifier:10.1063/PT.3.3243. ISSN 0031-9228. 
  5. "David B. Cline | UCLA Physics & Astronomy". http://www.pa.ucla.edu/content/david-b-cline. 
  6. "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1984". https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1984/rubbia/biographical/. 
  7. Taubes, Gary. (1988). Nobel dreams : power, deceit, and the ultimate experiment. Tempus Books. ISBN 1556151128. OCLC 753097656. 
  8. "Carrying the weak force: Thirty years of the W boson". https://home.cern/news/news/physics/carrying-weak-force-thirty-years-w-boson. 
  9. Bowen, Mark (2017). The Telescope in the Ice. St. Martin's Press. pp. 96–9. ISBN 978-1137280084. 
  10. "David B. Cline | UCLA Physics & Astronomy". http://www.pa.ucla.edu/content/david-b-cline. 
  11. "David B. Cline | UCLA Physics & Astronomy". http://www.pa.ucla.edu/content/david-b-cline. 
  12. "David B. Cline | UCLA Physics & Astronomy". http://www.pa.ucla.edu/content/david-b-cline. 

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Advertisement