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Daniel Harris Reynolds
Born (1832-12-14)December 14, 1832
Died March 14, 1902(1902-03-14) (aged 69)
Place of birth Centerburg, Ohio
Place of death Lake Village, Arkansas
Buried at Lake Village Cemetery
Lake Village, Arkansas
Allegiance  Confederate States of America
Service/branch Confederate States Army
Years of service 1861–1865
Rank 35px Brigadier General
Battles/wars American Civil War

Daniel Harris Reynolds (December 14, 1832 – March 14, 1902) was a Confederate States Army brigadier general during the American Civil War. He was born at Centerburg, Ohio but moved to Iowa, Tennessee and finally to Arkansas before the Civil War. He was a lawyer in Arkansas before the war. After the war, Reynolds resume his practice of law and was a member of the Arkansas Senate for one term.

Early life

Daniel Harris Reynolds was born on December 14, 1832 in Centerburg, Ohio.[1][2] He attended Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio.[2][3] Future Confederate Brigadier General Otho F. Strahl was a classmate.[2] Reynolds studied law privately at Somerville, Tennessee.[2][3] He was admitted to the bar in 1858.[2][3] In that same year, he moved to Lake Village, Arkansas.[2][3]

American Civil War

Daniel H. Reynolds became a captain of cavalry in the Arkansas militia on May 25, 1861.[1] This unit became Company "A" of the 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles in the Confederate States Army and Reynolds became its captain on June 14, 1861.[1][2] He served with this unit at the Battle of Wilson's Creek under then Colonel Thomas J. Churchill.[2][3] After engaging in some skirmishes in Missouri and Arkansas, and the Battle of Pea Ridge[4] the regiment transferred to service under Major General Earl Van Dorn, operating east of the Mississippi River.[3]

The regiment then fought, on foot, under Lieutenant General E. Kirby Smith, and later under General Braxton Bragg,[5] in Kentucky and east Tennessee in 1862[3] and in the Tullahoma Campaign.[4] Reynolds became the regiment's major on April 14, 1862, its lieutenant colonel on May 1, 1862 and its colonel on September 20, 1863, after the Battle of Chickamauga.[1][2] Reynolds won many commendations for his service,[2] including praise from Brigadier General Bushrod Johnson for his efforts at Chickamauga.[3]

Reynolds was appointed a brigadier general on March 5, 1864.[1] In April and May, he held brigade commands in the Confederate Departments of the Gulf and of Alabama and East Mississippi.[1] as part of the garrison at Mobile, Alabama.[4] His brigade then became part of Brigadier General James Cantey's division in the Army of Tennessee in May 1864.[1] They fought in the Atlanta Campaign,[5] Franklin-Nashville Campaign and Carolinas Campaign.[2]

Reynolds was slightly wounded at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee on November 30, 1864 where six Confederate generals were killed and six others were wounded.[1][6] He did not officially report the wound. He took part in the Battle of Nashville with his brigade,[4] which helped cover the Confederate retreat from that battle.[3]

He returned to command a brigade in General George D. Johnston's division in February 1865.[1] Reynolds was struck by a cannonball and lost his left leg at the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina on March 19, 1865.[1]

Daniel H. Reynolds was paroled at Charlottesville, Virginia on May 29, 1865 and pardoned on November 13, 1866.[1]

Aftermath

After the war, Reynolds married and raised five children. He also resumed his law practice at Lake Village, Arkansas, and served in the Arkansas state senate for one term in 1866–1867.[1][2]

Daniel Harris Reynolds died at Lake Village, Arkansas on March 14, 1902 and is buried at Lake Village Cemetery.[1]

See also

Notes

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8047-3641-3. p. 450
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. ISBN 0-8071-0823-5. pp. 255-256
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Longacre, Edward G. "Reynolds, Daniel Harris" in Historical Times Illustrated History of the Civil War, edited by Patricia L. Faust. New York: Harper & Row, 1986. ISBN 978-0-06-273116-6. p. 625
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Sifakis, Stewart. Who Was Who in the Civil War. New York: Facts On File, 1988. ISBN 0-8160-1055-2. pp. 538-539
  5. 5.0 5.1 Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: McKay, 1988. ISBN 0-8129-1726-X. First published New York, McKay, 1959. pp. 693-694
  6. McPherson, James M. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. Oxford History of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988. ISBN 0-19-503863-0. p. 812

References

  • Bender, Robert Patrick (ed.). Worthy of the Cause for Which They Fight: The Civil War Diary of Brigadier General Daniel Harris Reynolds, 1861–1865. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1-55728-971-1.
  • Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: McKay, 1988. ISBN 0-8129-1726-X. First published New York, McKay, 1959.
  • Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Longacre, Edward G. "Reynolds, Daniel Harris" in Historical Times Illustrated History of the Civil War, edited by Patricia L. Faust. New York: Harper & Row, 1986. ISBN 978-0-06-273116-6. p. 625.
  • McPherson, James M. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. Oxford History of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988. ISBN 0-19-503863-0.
  • Sifakis, Stewart. Who Was Who in the Civil War. New York: Facts On File, 1988. ISBN 0-8160-1055-2.
  • Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. ISBN 0-8071-0823-5.

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