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==Biography==
 
==Biography==
Smith was born March 7, 1826 in Standish, Maine<ref name="findagrave"/>, Jones was living in Maine when he joined the U.S. Navy. He served during the Civil War as a [[Coxswain]] on the {{USS|Rhode Island|1860|6}}.<ref name="hallofvalor"/><ref name="citation"/>
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Smith was born March 7, 1826 in Standish, Maine,<ref name="findagrave"/> Jones was living in Maine when he joined the U.S. Navy. He served during the Civil War as a [[Coxswain]] on the {{USS|Rhode Island|1860|6}}.<ref name="hallofvalor"/><ref name="citation"/>
   
Smith died February 4, 1898 in Concord, Vermont<ref name="findagrave"/>. He is buried in Ocean View Cemetery, Wells, Maine<ref name="findagrave"/>.
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Smith died February 4, 1898 in Concord, Vermont.<ref name="findagrave"/> He is buried in Ocean View Cemetery, Wells, Maine.<ref name="findagrave"/>
   
 
==Medal of Honor citation==
 
==Medal of Honor citation==
 
Smith's official Medal of Honor citation reads:
 
Smith's official Medal of Honor citation reads:
 
Rank and organization: Coxswain, U.S. Navy. Born: 1826, Maine. Accredited to: Maine. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.
 
Rank and organization: Coxswain, U.S. Navy. Born: 1826, Maine. Accredited to: Maine. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.
<blockquote>On board the {{USS|Rhode Island|1860|6}} which was engaged in rescuing men from the stricken {{USS|Monitor}} in Mobile Bay, on December 30, 1862. After the Monitor sprang a leak and went down, Smith courageously risked his life in a gallant attempt to rescue members of the crew. Although he, too, lost his life during the hazardous operation, he had made every effort possible to save the lives of his fellow men.''<ref name="citation"/>.</blockquote>
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<blockquote>On board the {{USS|Rhode Island|1860|6}} which was engaged in rescuing men from the stricken {{USS|Monitor}} in Mobile Bay, on December 30, 1862. After the Monitor sprang a leak and went down, Smith courageously risked his life in a gallant attempt to rescue members of the crew. Although he, too, lost his life during the hazardous operation, he had made every effort possible to save the lives of his fellow men.''.<ref name="citation"/></blockquote>
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
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| date = June 27, 2011
 
| date = June 27, 2011
 
| url = http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwarmz.html
 
| url = http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwarmz.html
| accessdate = April 30, 2016}}</ref>
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| accessdate = April 30, 2016
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|archive-url=http://web.archive.org/web/20190901225510/https://history.army.mil/html/moh/civwarmz.html
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|archive-date=September 1, 2019
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|url-status=dead}}</ref>
 
}}
 
}}
   

Latest revision as of 11:21, 24 May 2020

Charles H. Smith
Born (1826-03-07)March 7, 1826
Standish, Maine
Died February 4, 1898(1898-02-04) (aged 71)
Concord, Vermont
Place of burial Ocean View Cemetery, Wells, Maine
Military career
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Rank Coxswain
Unit USS Rhode Island
Battles/wars American Civil War
Awards Medal of Honor

Charles H. Smith (March 7, 1826 - February 4, 1898) was a Union Navy sailor in the American Civil War and a recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions aboard the USS Rhode Island.

Biography[]

Smith was born March 7, 1826 in Standish, Maine,[1] Jones was living in Maine when he joined the U.S. Navy. He served during the Civil War as a Coxswain on the USS Rhode Island.[2][3]

Smith died February 4, 1898 in Concord, Vermont.[1] He is buried in Ocean View Cemetery, Wells, Maine.[1]

Medal of Honor citation[]

Smith's official Medal of Honor citation reads: Rank and organization: Coxswain, U.S. Navy. Born: 1826, Maine. Accredited to: Maine. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

On board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in rescuing men from the stricken USS Monitor in Mobile Bay, on December 30, 1862. After the Monitor sprang a leak and went down, Smith courageously risked his life in a gallant attempt to rescue members of the crew. Although he, too, lost his life during the hazardous operation, he had made every effort possible to save the lives of his fellow men..[3]

See also[]

References[]