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Bouclier-class destroyer
Bouclier-Marius Bar.jpg
Bouclier, lead ship of the series, circa 1914
Class overview
Name: Bouclier class
Operators:  French Navy
Built: 1910–1912
In commission: 1911–1933
Completed: 12
Lost: 4
Retired: 8
General characteristics
Tonnage: 800 t (787 long tons)[1]
Length: 76.3 m (250 ft 4 in)[1]
Beam: 7.6 m (24 ft 11 in)[1]
Draught: 2.9 m (9 ft 6 in)[1]
Installed power: 13,500 shp (10,067 kW)[1]
Speed: 34 knots (63 km/h; 39 mph)[1]
Complement: 82[1]
Armament: • 2 × 100 mm (3.9 in) 1893 Model guns
• 4 × 65 mm (2.6 in) 1902 Model guns
• 2 × twin trainable 450 mm (18 in) torpedo tubes
Armour: None

The Bouclier class, or Casque class, was a class of twelve destroyers of the French Navy built between 1910 and 1912, four of which were lost during the First World War.

This 800-tonne class were built by various shipyards to a general specification that included oil-fired boilers and steam turbines. This allowed for some variations in size (from 237–256 ft (72–78 m) in length) and machinery (Bouclier and Casque had three shafts, all the others had two, while Casque has three funnels, all the rest had four). Speeds also varied, Bory was the slowest at only 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph), while Bouclier achieved 35.5 knots (65.7 km/h; 40.9 mph) in trails.[2]

All ships of the class received the standard armament of two 100 mm (3.9 in) 1893 Model guns, four 65 mm (2.6 in) 1902 Model guns and two twin trainable 450 mm (18 in) torpedo tubes. During World War I, a 45 mm (1.8 in) or 75 mm (3.0 in) anti-aircraft gun, two 8 mm (0.31 in) machine guns, and eight or ten Guiraud-type depth charges were added.[2]

All but three (Bouclier, Capitaine Mehl and Francis Garnier) of the ships in the class served in the Mediterranean Sea between 1914-1918.[2]

Ships

Name Builder Launched Fate
Bouclier Normand, Le Havre 29 June 1911 Struck, 15 February 1933
Boutefeu Dyle et Bacalan, Bordeaux 2 May 1911 Sunk by mine laid by UC-25 off Brindisi, 15 May 1917
Capitaine Mehl A. et Ch. de la Loire, St. Nazaire 20 April 1912 Struck, 10 July 1926
Casque F. et Ch. de la Méditerranée, Le Havre 25 August 1910 Struck, 26 March 1926. Broken up, 1927.
Cimeterre F. et Ch. de la Gironde, Bordeaux 13 April 1911 Struck, 10 July 1926
Commandant Bory Dyle et Bacalan, Bordeaux 14 September 1912 Struck, 29 July 1926
Commandant Rivière F. et Ch. de la Bordeaux 2 October 1912 Struck, June 1933
Dague F. et Ch. de la Bordeaux 13 April 1911 Sunk by a drifting mine in Antivari Roads, 24 February 1915
Dehorter Penhoët, St. Nazaire 18 April 1912 Struck, 1933
Faulx De la Brosse et Fouche, Nantes 2 February 1911 Accidentally rammed and sunk by Mangini in Strait of Otranto, 18 April 1918
Fourche De la Brosse et Fouche, Nantes 21 October 1910 Torpedoed and sunk by U-15, 23 June 1918
Francis Garnier Normand, Le Havre 1 October 1912 Struck, 10 February 1926

References

  • naval-history.net (English)
  • Roche, Jean-Michel (2005). "Classement par types". Dictionnaire des bâtiments de la flotte de guerre française de Colbert à nos jours 2, 1870 - 2006. Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. 


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