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'''Battle of Tachiao''' (March 18–19, 1942), was the first clash in the [[Battle of Yunnan-Burma Road]] in the [[Burma Campaign]] of [[World War II]] and [[Second Sino-Japanese War]].
 
'''Battle of Tachiao''' (March 18–19, 1942), was the first clash in the [[Battle of Yunnan-Burma Road]] in the [[Burma Campaign]] of [[World War II]] and [[Second Sino-Japanese War]].
   
 
Advanced elements of the [[200th Division]] arrived at Toungoo on March 8, 1942 and took over defensive positions from the British forces. The city of Toungoo itself would be the main defensive position of the Chinese forces, with an outpost a few kilometers to the south at [[Oktwin]]. Major-General [[Dai Anlan]] the divisional commander, sent the Motorized Cavalry Regiment and 1st Company, 598th Infantry Regiment to the banks of the Kan River 35 miles south of Toungoo and 12 miles south of the town of Pyu. The cavalry regiment plus a company of infantry pushed up to Kan River, with a platoon of cyclists taking up positions at the bridge over the river.
 
Advanced elements of the [[200th Division]] arrived at Toungoo on March 8, 1942 and took over defensive positions from the British forces. The city of Toungoo itself would be the main defensive position of the Chinese forces, with an outpost a few kilometers to the south at [[Oktwin]]. Major-General [[Dai Anlan]] the divisional commander, sent the Motorized Cavalry Regiment and 1st Company, 598th Infantry Regiment to the banks of the Kan River 35 miles south of Toungoo and 12 miles south of the town of Pyu. The cavalry regiment plus a company of infantry pushed up to Kan River, with a platoon of cyclists taking up positions at the bridge over the river.
   
At first light on March 18, about 200 Japanese reconnaissance troops from the 143rd Regiment of the 55th Division advanced right up to the bridge on motorbikes. Reaching the outposts they were ambushed by the Chinese troops hiding along the sides of the road. Chinese armoured cars joined the attack and after three hours of fighting the Japanese fell back, leaving some 30 dead behind together with some twenty rifles, two light machine guns and some 19 motorbikes. After night fell, the Japanese continued their attacks with small units, and the Chinese covering force fell back toward their line at Oktwin. Following up the next day, Pyu fell to the Japanese on the 19th.
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At first light on March 18, about 200 Japanese reconnaissance troops from the 143rd Regiment of the 55th Division advanced right up to the bridge on motorbikes. Reaching the outposts they were ambushed by the Chinese troops hiding along the sides of the road. Chinese armoured cars joined the attack and after three hours of fighting the Japanese fell back, leaving some 30 dead behind together with some twenty rifles, two light machine guns and some 19 motorbikes. After night fell, the Japanese continued their attacks with small units, and the Chinese covering force fell back toward their line at Oktwin. Following up the next day, Pyu fell to the Japanese on the 19th.
 
==See also==
 
== See also ==
 
 
*[[Battle of Oktwin]]
 
*[[Battle of Oktwin]]
   
 
==References==
 
==References==
*{{cite book|author1= Hsu Long-hsuen|author2= Chang Ming-kai|title= History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945)|edition= 2nd Ed. |date=1971|editor= Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung |publisher= Chung Wu Publishing |location=33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China|page= 376}}
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*{{cite book|author1= Hsu Long-hsuen|author2= Chang Ming-kai|title= History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945)|edition= 2nd Ed. |year=1971|editor= Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung |publisher= Chung Wu Publishing |location=33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China|page= 376}}
*{{cite book|author= Guo Rugui|editor= Huang Yuzhang|publisher=Jiangsu People's Publishing House|date= 1 July 2005|ISBN= 7-214-03034-9|title=China's Anti-Japanese War Combat Operations (中国抗日战争正面战场作战记)|url= http://www.wehoo.net/book/wlwh/a30012/A0170.htm }} {{zh icon}}
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*{{cite book|author= Guo Rugui|editor= Huang Yuzhang|publisher=Jiangsu People's Publishing House|date= 1 July 2005|ISBN= 7-214-03034-9|title=China's Anti-Japanese War Combat Operations (中国抗日战争正面战场作战记)|url= http://www.wehoo.net/book/wlwh/a30012/A0170.htm}} {{zh icon}}
 
*{{cite book|title=Yuan zheng Yin Mian kang zhan (Battles of the Expeditionary Force in India and Burma)|publisher=Zhongguo wen shi chu ban she|date=1 January 1998|author=A collection of memoirs and first hand accounts by KMT officers}}
 
*{{cite book|title=Yuan zheng Yin Mian kang zhan (Battles of the Expeditionary Force in India and Burma)|publisher=Zhongguo wen shi chu ban she|date=1 January 1998|author=A collection of memoirs and first hand accounts by KMT officers}}
   
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{{coord|18.939529|96.433144|display=title}}
 
{{coord|18.939529|96.433144|display=title}}
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{{Wikipedia|Battle of Tachiao}}
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[[Category:Military history of Burma during World War II]]
 
[[Category:Military history of Burma during World War II]]
 
[[Category:World War II operations and battles of the Southeast Asia Theatre]]
 
[[Category:World War II operations and battles of the Southeast Asia Theatre]]

Latest revision as of 01:15, 19 February 2018

Battle of Tachiao (March 18–19, 1942), was the first clash in the Battle of Yunnan-Burma Road in the Burma Campaign of World War II and Second Sino-Japanese War.

Advanced elements of the 200th Division arrived at Toungoo on March 8, 1942 and took over defensive positions from the British forces. The city of Toungoo itself would be the main defensive position of the Chinese forces, with an outpost a few kilometers to the south at Oktwin. Major-General Dai Anlan the divisional commander, sent the Motorized Cavalry Regiment and 1st Company, 598th Infantry Regiment to the banks of the Kan River 35 miles south of Toungoo and 12 miles south of the town of Pyu. The cavalry regiment plus a company of infantry pushed up to Kan River, with a platoon of cyclists taking up positions at the bridge over the river.

At first light on March 18, about 200 Japanese reconnaissance troops from the 143rd Regiment of the 55th Division advanced right up to the bridge on motorbikes. Reaching the outposts they were ambushed by the Chinese troops hiding along the sides of the road. Chinese armoured cars joined the attack and after three hours of fighting the Japanese fell back, leaving some 30 dead behind together with some twenty rifles, two light machine guns and some 19 motorbikes. After night fell, the Japanese continued their attacks with small units, and the Chinese covering force fell back toward their line at Oktwin. Following up the next day, Pyu fell to the Japanese on the 19th.

See also[]

References[]

External links[]

Coordinates: 18°56′22″N 96°25′59″E / 18.939529°N 96.433144°E / 18.939529; 96.433144

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