Military Wiki
Advertisement

Question book-new.svg

The factual accuracy of this article may be compromised due to out-of-date information

Icebreaker Moscow during the final stage of construction on the Baltic Shipyard, 2008

May 1900: Launch of the battleship Pobeda (Victory) on the Baltic Shipyard

Workers of the Baltic Shipyards in 1971

The Baltic Shipyard (Baltiysky Zavod, formerly Shipyard-189) (Russian: Балтийский завод имени С. Орджоникидзе) is one of the oldest shipyards in Russia. It is located in Saint Petersburg in the south-western part of Vasilievsky Island. It is one of the three shipyards active in Saint Petersburg. Together with the Admiralty Shipyard it has been responsible for building a large part of Imperial Russian battleships as well as Soviet nuclear-powered icebreakers. Currently it is specializing in merchant ships while the Admiralty yard specializes in diesel-electric submarines.

Part of United Shipbuilding Corporation

History

The shipyard was founded in 1856 by the St. Petersburg merchant M. Carr and the Scotsman M. L. MacPherson. It subsequently became the Carr and MacPherson yard.[1] In 1864 it built two monitors of the Uragan class.[1] In 1874 the shipyard was sold to Prince Ochtomski.[1]

In 1934 the shipyard started work on the three prototypes for the S-class submarine, based on a German design produced by the Dutch company Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw. The Soviets renamed the shipyard Numbered Zavod 189 'im. Sergo Ordzhonikidze' on 30 December 1936.

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Polmar, Norman; Noot, Jurrien (1991). "Submarine building yards" (Google Books). Submarines of the Russian and Soviet Navies, 1718-1990 (illustrated ed.). Naval Institute Press,. pp. 325–326. ISBN 0-87021-570-1. http://books.google.com/books?id=7cDN8q2RHGMC&pg=PP1&dq=polmar+soviet+submarines&ei=dmx4SunkLYHENdXysUw#v=onepage&q=shipyard%20leningrad&f=false. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 

External links

Coordinates: 59°55′53″N 30°15′29″E / 59.93139°N 30.25806°E / 59.93139; 30.25806

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Advertisement