Military Wiki
Advertisement
Asagiri-class destroyer
JDS Yugiri anchored in the Solent, as part of the Trafalgar 200 celebrations.
JDS Yugiri anchored in the Solent
Class overview
Builders: IHI Corporation
Hitachi Zosen Corporation
Sumitomo Heavy Industries
Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
Operators: JMSDF
Preceded by: Hatsuyuki-class destroyer
Succeeded by: Murasame-class destroyer
Built: 1986–1989
In commission: 1986–
Completed: 8
Active: 8
General characteristics
Displacement: 3,500 tons standard, 4,900 tons hull load
Length: 137 m (449 ft 6 in)
Beam: 14.6 m (47 ft 11 in)
Draft: 4.5 m (14 ft 9 in)
Depth: 8.8 m (28 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: 4 gas turbines 54,000 shaft horsepower
Speed: 30 knots (56 km/h)
Range: 8,030 nmi (14,870 km) at 14 kn (26 km/h)
Complement: 220
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • OYQ-6/7 CDS (w/ Link-11)
  • OPS-14/24 Air search radar
  • OPS-28 surface search radar
  • OQS-4A hull sonar
  • OQR-1 TACTASS
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
  • NOLR-8 intercept
  • OLT-3 jammer
  • Mark 36 SRBOC
  • Armament:
  • 1 × Otobreda 76 mm gun
  • 2 × 20 mm Phalanx CIWS
  • 2 × quad Harpoon SSM launchers
  • 1 × Mk.29 Sea Sparrow SAM octuple launcher
  • 1 × Mk.16 ASROC anti-submarine rocket octuple launcher
  • 2 × HOS-302A triple 324 mm (12.8 in) torpedo tubes
  • Aircraft carried: 1 × SH-60J(K) anti-submarine helicopter

    The Asagiri-class destroyer was built during the 1980s for service with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force. This class of general purpose destroyer is an extended version of its predecessor Hatsuyuki-class destroyers, and is mainly tasked with ASW and ASUW. The Asagiri-class vessels feature several enhancements and/or improvements over the Hatusyuki class, such as:

    COGAG Propulsion System.
    Compared with the COGOG propulsion system of the Hatsuyuki-class, this class has the COGAG propulsion system with enhanced capacity. The COGAG propulsion system is composed of four Kawasaki-Rolls-Royce Spey SM1A gas turbines.[1]
    Advanced radar systems.
    This class is equipped with the OPS-28 surface search radar. The OPS-28 is analogous to the American Target Acquisition System Mk.23 with the Track while scan capability. Later ships of this class introduced the OPS-24 air search 3D radar. The OPS-24 is the first shipboard active electronically scanned array radar in the world.[2]
    Full-configuration destroyer CDS.
    The earlier batch was equipped the OYQ-6 combat direction system (CDS). This system employed one AN/UYK-20 computer as the same as OYQ-5 tactical data processing system of the Hatsuyuki-class, but it can exchange tactical data via Link-11, which the OYQ-5 does not support. Later, all OYQ-6 systems were upgraded to the OYQ-7, integrated with OYQ-101 ASW Direction System.[3]
    All ships of this class were later retrofitted with the terminal for the MOF system, the key operational C4I system of the JMSDF which uses the Superbird SHF-SATCOM.[3]
    Enlarged aircraft facility.
    The hangar is enlarged in order to accommodate two helicopters, but generally only one helicopter is used operationally.[4]

    Asagiri, Yugiri, and Amagiri were named after World War II destroyers. Amagiri's World War II namesake rammed and sank PT-109.

    The Yamagiri and Asagiri have been converted into training vessels.

    Ships in the class

    Pennant no. Name Laid down Launched Commissioned Builder Home port Note
    DD-151
    TV-3516
    Asagiri 19 September 1986 1988 IHI Corporation, Tokyo Kure   Converted to training vessel (TV-3516) on 16 February 2005
    re-converted to DD-151 on March 2012
    DD-152
    TV-3515
    Yamagiri 10 October 1987 1989 Mitsui, Tamano Kure   Converted to training vessel (TV-3515) on 18 March 2004,
    re-converted to DD-152 on March 2011
    DD-153 Yūgiri 21 September 1987 1989 Sumitomo Heavy Industries Uraga Shipyard Ominato  
    DD-154 Amagiri 9 September 1987 1989 IHI Corporation Maizuru  
    DD-155 Hamagiri 4 June 1988 1990 Hitachi, Maizuru Ominato  
    DD-156 Setogiri 12 September 1988 1990 Hitachi, Maizuru Ominato  
    DD-157 Sawagiri 25 December 1988 1990 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Nagasaki Shipyard Sasebo  
    DD-158 Umigiri 11 September 1989 1991 IHI Corporation Kure  

    References

    1. Yasuo Abe (June 2011). "2. Propulsion system (Hardware of JMSDF destroyers)" (in Japanese). Kaijin-sha. pp. 106–111. 
    2. Tomohiko Tada (March 2010). "4. Radar/ECM/ESM (Shipboard weapons of JMSDF 1952-2010)" (in Japanese). Kaijin-sha. pp. 100–105. 
    3. 3.0 3.1 Makoto Yamazaki (October 2011). "Combat systems of modern Japanese destroyers" (in Japanese). Kaijin-sha. pp. 98–107. 
    4. "History of Japanese destroyers since 1952" (in Japanese). Kaijin-sha. June 2011. pp. 91–97. 
    • Heihachiro Fujiki (August 2003). "Development of multi-purpose DDs for "8-8 escort flotilla" (in Japanese language). Kaijinn-sha. pp. p94-99. 

    External links

    Advertisement