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Aristaenus (Ancient Greek: Ἀρίσταινος) of Megalopolis, was sometimes called "Aristaenetus" by Polybius[1] and Plutarch.[2] Aristaenus, however, appears to be the correct name.

He was strategus of the Achaean league in 198 BCE, and induced the Achaeans to join the Romans in the war against Philip V of Macedon. Polybius defends him from the charge of treachery for having done so. In the following year (197 BCE) he was again strategus and accompanied the consul Titus Quinctius Flamininus to his interview with Philip.[3][4] In the same year he also persuaded the Boeotians to take up the side of the Romans.[5]

In 195 BCE, when he was yet again strategus, he joined Flamininus with 10,000 foot soldiers and 1000 horse in order to attack the Spartan ruler Nabis.[6] He was also strategus in 185 BCE, and attacked Philopoemen and Lycortas for their conduct in relation to the embassy that had been sent to Ptolemy V Epiphanes.[7]

Aristaenus was the political opponent of Philopoemen, and showed more readiness to satisfy the wishes of the Romans than Philopoemen did. He was eloquent and skilled in politics, but described as being not especially distinguished in war.[2][8][9]

Some historians think that he is to be identified with Aristaenos of Dyme, son of Timocades or Damocades, who was hipparch 208/07 BC. Others hold that they were two different persons.

References

  1. Johann Gottfried Schweighäuser, On Polybius 17.1
  2. 2.0 2.1 Plutarch, Philopoemen 13, 17
  3. Polybius, The Histories 32.19-21, 32
  4. Polybius, The Histories 17.1, 7, 13
  5. Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Libri 33.2
  6. Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Libri 34.25, &c.
  7. Polybius, The Histories 23.7, 9, 10
  8. Polybius, The Histories 25.9
  9. Pausanias, Description of Greece 8.51.1

External links

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed (1870). "Aristaenus". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. p. 288. 
Preceded by
Cycliadas
Strategos of the Achaean League
199 BC – 198 BC
Succeeded by
Nicostratos
Preceded by
Nicostratos
Strategos of the Achaean League
195 BC – 194 BC
Succeeded by
Philopoimen
Preceded by
Philopoimen
Strategos of the Achaean League
186 BC – 185 BC
Succeeded by
Lykortas of Megalopolis

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