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71st Rescue Squadron
71st Rescue Squadron.jpg
71st Rescue Squadron Patch
Active 14 November 1952 - 18 March 1960
8 March 1970 - 30 June 1991
1 October 1991 - Present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Type Combat Search and Rescue
Part of Air Combat Command
23d Wing
347th Rescue Group
Garrison/HQ Moody Air Force Base
Decorations Outstanding Unit ribbon.svg AFOUA

The 71st Rescue Squadron (71 RQS) is part of the 347th Rescue Group at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. It flies HC-130 Hercules aircraft conducting search and rescue missions.

Mission

The 71 RQS maintains combat-ready status with 11 aircraft as one of only two active duty HC-130P, combat search and rescue (CSAR) squadrons. This squadron rapidly mobilizes, deploys, and executes CSAR operations worldwide in support of national security interests. This mission requires the squadron to conduct low-level operations and air refueling using night vision goggles (NVGs) and airdrop pararescue personnel in support of combat personnel recovery.[1]

History

The 71st flew search, rescue and recovery missions in Alaska from, 1952–1960 and 1970-1991. It has flown aerial refueling missions for search and rescue operations since 1991. The squadron has supported the combat search and rescue mission in Southwest Asia with aircraft and crews since 1992.[2]

Operations

Lineage[2]

  • 71st Air Rescue Squadron (1952–1969)
  • 71st Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron (1969–1989)
  • 71st Air Rescue Squadron (1989–1993)
  • 71st Rescue Squadron (1993–Present)

Assignments[2]

  • 10th Air Rescue Group (1952–1957)
  • Air Rescue Service (1957–1960)
  • 39th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing (1970–1974)
    • Attached: Detachment 1, 39th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing (8 March 1970 - 30 June 1971)
    • Attached: Elmendorf Rescue Coordination Center (1 July 1971 - 24 June 1972)
    • Attached: Alaskan Air Command Rescue Coordination Center (25 June 1972 - 30 June 1991)

  • 41st Rescue and Weather Reconnaissance (1974–1989)
  • Air Rescue Service (1989–1991, 1991–1993)
  • 1st Operations Group (1993–1995)
  • 1st Rescue Group (1995–1997)
  • 347th Rescue Group (1997–Present)

Bases stationed[2]

Aircraft Operated[2]

References

Notes

Bibliography

See also

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