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10.5 cm hruby kanon vz. 35

10.5 cm hrubý kanón vz. 35
Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-228-0301-09A, Frankreich, Artilleriestellung, Geschütz.jpg

10.5 cm hk vz. 35 captured by the Wehrmacht, place as coastal artillery in France
Type Howitzer
Place of origin Czechoslovakia
Service history
In service 1935-1945
Used by Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia
Flag of German Reich (1935–1945).svg  Nazi Germany
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia
Wars World War II
Production history
Designer Skoda
Manufacturer Skoda
Produced 1935?-41
Specifications
Weight 4,200 kilograms (9,300 lb)
Barrel length 4.4 metres (14 ft) L/42

Caliber 105 mm (4.13 in)
Breech sliding block
Carriage split trail
Elevation -6° to +42°
Traverse 50°
Rate of fire 8 rpm
Muzzle velocity 730 m/s (2,395 ft/s)
Maximum range 18,100 metres (19,800 yd)

The 10.5 cm hrubý kanón vz. 35 (Heavy Gun model 35) was a Czech field gun used in the Second World War. Those weapons captured after the German invasion of Czechoslovakia in March 1939 were taken into Wehrmacht service as the 10.5 cm K 35(t). Former Yugoslav guns were designated as the 10.5 cm Kanone 339(j). It was used by a variety of German units during World War II, especially on coastal defense duties. 36 were in service with the Slovak Army.[1]

Design & History

It was designed solely for motor traction. It fired 18 kilograms (40 lb) HE, canister and semi-armor piercing shells.

Notes

  1. Kliment and Nakládal, p. 123

Bibliography

  • Engelmann, Joachim and Scheibert, Horst. Deutsche Artillerie 1934-1945: Eine Dokumentation in Text, Skizzen und Bildern: Ausrüstung, Gliederung, Ausbildung, Führung, Einsatz. Limburg/Lahn, Germany: C. A. Starke, 1974
  • Gander, Terry and Chamberlain, Peter. Weapons of the Third Reich: An Encyclopedic Survey of All Small Arms, Artillery and Special Weapons of the German Land Forces 1939-1945. New York: Doubleday, 1979 ISBN 0-385-15090-3
  • Kliment, Charles K. and Nakládal, Bretislav. Germany's First Ally: Armed Forces of the Slovak State 1939-1945. Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 1997 ISBN 0-7643-0589-1


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